Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide

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Hi all,

Just finished building my system:

Intel Core Duo 2 x6800 extreme
EVGA nvidia 680i motherboard
2 x 1gb PatriotPC2-8500 1066mhz EL
1 x BFG GF8800 GTX
Koolance CPU watercooling

I'm new to intel systems but would like to run some overclocking tests.
I've searched the net but find how high the cpu will go but not on how to
get there!  Any links / help appreciated.

Tia, Chris



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



'GreenBean' wrote:
| Just finished building my system:
|
| Intel Core Duo 2 x6800 extreme
| EVGA nvidia 680i motherboard
| 2 x 1gb PatriotPC2-8500 1066mhz EL
| 1 x BFG GF8800 GTX
| Koolance CPU watercooling
|
| I'm new to intel systems but would like to run some overclocking tests.
| I've searched the net but find how high the cpu will go but not on how to
| get there!  Any links / help appreciated.

There are procedures for overclocking, but the specifics of what will work
for your particular system only you can discover, through trial and error.

Below is a set of procedures I have posted to this newsgroup several times.
The specific information does not cover the newer CPUs, but the approach is
an example for any overclocking.

Keep in mind that CPUs that are specified for the top speeds in a family
have little overclocking potential compared to CPUs in the same family
specified for a slower speed.

All Pentium CPUs can be overclocked; some do better than others.

If the motherboard is 'overclocking friendly',
an Intel CPU is very easy to overclock.  If the motherboard is NOT
'overclocking friendly' the task is much more difficult.  If your
motherboard is 'overclocking friendly' the manual likely gives all the
information necessary to overclock, though the manual may have been
translated back and forth among several languages, and the information may
be a bit confusing.

#1.  Raising the CPU voltage can destroy your CPU.  NEVER raise the CPU
voltage more than a total of 15%.  If you do raise it, do it in very small
steps.

#2.  Raising the CPU clock speed will NOT damage your Intel CPU,
motherboard, memory, or anything else.  If you raise the clock speed too
much, the system will either to run in a stable manner, or will fail to
boot.  This is not a problem because either the BIOS will automatically
reset to default values or there will be directions in the manual on how to
reset to default speeds.

#3.  In overclocking, make any changes in small steps, checking for proper
operation after each change.

#4.  Overclocking works best when the CPU temperature is kept as low as
possible.

#5.  Intel CPUs can ONLY be overclocked by raising the clock speed.  Even if
the multiplier can be set in the BIOS, changing this settings has NO effect.

#6.  Some older motherboards may report an incorrect speed for CPUs that
have a higher speed than available when the BIOS was installed.

#7.  Intel CPUs have a quad-pumped memory bus; that means data is
transferred four times for each clock cycle; for a 533 MHz FrontSide Bus
speed the clock
speed is 133 MHz.  That 133 MHz clock speed is multiplied by a factor FIXED
and UNCHANGABLE inside the CPU to give the overall CPU clock speed.

#8.  The rated speed of the installed memory can limit the overclock.
Memory can be overclocked, but it will eventually reach a limit.  Faster
memory can be installed, but the cost may not be worth it.  The memory clock
can be set to a lower ratio (with some motherboards) to allow higher clock
speeds, but there is a performance penalty.

How you overclock depends on the specifics of your system, how much patience
you have, and much attention you pay to details.

A general approach:

* Download and install MotherBoard Monitor 5 (free) at
     http://mbm.livewiredev.com/ .  This will allow you to monitor and
record the CPU speeds, fan speeds, CPU temperature (and perhaps motherboard,
memory, and other temperatures, and voltages.)  [ MotherBoard Monitor 5 is
no
longer being updated, so you will need to use a different monitor program,
perhaps
one included with your motherboard. ]

* Download and install SiSoft Sandra 2007 Lite (free) at
     http://www.sisoftware.net/ .  This program is a collection of
information gathering applets for your system.  It also has low level tests
of performance, as well as stress tests (necessary to establish proper
operation when the CPU is operating at full capacity.

* Read the manual carefully.

* Clean the heatsink fins, and fans of all dust, grease, and dirt.

* Write down the settings in the BIOS.

* Write down the temperature and voltage information from SiSoft Sandra.

* Check the voltages reported by MotherBoard Monitor 5 for you system.  If
any are outside the specifications this may affect the operation of your
system, especially if it is overclocked.  Also check the total rated output
of your power supply, if it is marginal, overclocking (since more power is
required) may also be marginal.

* Steps for overclocking your Intel CPU (only after completing the above
recommendations):

    #0.  The standard setup for PCI bus and AGP bus speeds are fractions of
the clock speed.  Make sure the PCI/AGP Bus speeds are instead locked at 33
MHz/67 MHz; if the PCI bus speed is more than 36 MHz corruption of data on
your hard drives can occur.

    #1.  Increase the clock speed by 5%.

    #2.  Reboot and check for operation.

    #3.  If #2 is successful, repeat #1.

    #4.  If #2 is not successful, raise the CPU core voltage by 0.05 volts
(in NO case raise this voltage to more than a total of 15%, doing so may
instantly destroy your CPU; when the core voltage reaches this limit go to
#6.)

    #5.  Go to #2.

    #6.  You have reached the limit of overclocking without changing other
factors which may include CPU cooling, System cooling, memory settings.
Installing memory capable of higher clock speeds may help.  On the other
hand, some of these changes may be expensive, and not worth the money for
the possible performance increase.


* After reaching the highest speed, check operation under full CPU load (use
SiSoft Sandra burn-in, other burn-in programs, or intense action 3D
accelerated first-person shooter games.)  If the system is not stable under
heavy load, try reducing the clock speed and/or CPU core voltage (higher
voltage means higher operating temperatures.)

* Check the installation of the CPU heatsink; new heatsink compound may help
CPU cooling.

* A better than stock heatsink/fan may aid overclocking.

* Improved system cooling may aid overclocking.

*  Exotic cooling of the CPU to room temperature or below can significantly
increase top speeds (or not, depending on the individual CPU speed, memory
quality, and motherboard.)

WARNINGS!!!
* Increasing the CPU voltage above 15% over specifications is likely to
INSTANTLY destroy the CPU
* There is always a chance that when you start fooling around inside the
system case of your computer that you may cause damage (the butterfinger
factor.)

You can find a LOT of additional information on the Internet, including the
speeds that others overclockers have reached with your model CPU.  One
question you must ask yourself is WHY you wish to overclock; I can think of
three reasons:

    #1.  Higher performance at little or no expense with your present
system.

    #2.  Just because you can, and enjoy experimenting

    #3.  Bragging rights - the highest possible speeds (which is going to
require a LOT more money.

Don't let this long list intimidate you; just go along step by step.

Phil Weldon




| Hi all,
|
| Just finished building my system:
|
| Intel Core Duo 2 x6800 extreme
| EVGA nvidia 680i motherboard
| 2 x 1gb PatriotPC2-8500 1066mhz EL
| 1 x BFG GF8800 GTX
| Koolance CPU watercooling
|
| I'm new to intel systems but would like to run some overclocking tests.
| I've searched the net but find how high the cpu will go but not on how to
| get there!  Any links / help appreciated.
|
| Tia, Chris
|
|



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Nice Build!!

You didn't mention your psu.

I have an E6600, 2gb ocz 6700, evga 8800gtx, Asus P5W DH Deluxe.

Your new mobo is a screamer to be sure. I found with heavy oc'ing that
my psu started to "blink" under heavy load.

Added a second 400w psu dedicated to the gpu. a 600w runs the rest of
the system. jumpered pins 14 and 17 on the atx connector to get the
400w psu to turn on.

Works great. now the 8800 is happy.

check out www.overclock.net

You'll find everything you need regarding oc'ing there.

Regards,

Al. (nuclearjock at overclock.net)
wrote:

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Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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Hi there - forgot to mention PSU - its a FSP Sparkle FX700-GLN Epsilon 700W

Thanks for o/c tips...I'll come back with results



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Hi there again....what is the default volatge for the c2d x6800 extreme and
what are the safe temp ranges for it?



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



'GreenBean' wrote:
| Hi there again....what is the default volatge for the c2d x6800 extreme
and
| what are the safe temp ranges for it?
_____

You can find that information the same place that everyone else does -
Intel.
http://www.intel.com
click on 'Product Support & Downloads'
click on 'Browse By Product'
click on 'Intel Core 2 Duo Desktop Processors'
click on 'Technical Documents'
click on
'<Intel® Core™2 Extreme Processor X6800? and Intel® Core™2 Duo Desktop
Processor E6000? Sequence Datasheet - on 65 nm Process in the 775-land LGA
Package and supporting Intel® Extended Memory 64 TechnologyF and supporting
Intel® Virtualization Technology±>'
under 'Desktop' under 'Datasheet'.

All technical specifications should be obtained directly from Intel.
As for safe temp ranges - the Core 2 Duo series and other recent Intel CPUs
throttle down automatically when safe temperatures are exceeded.  In
addition, all Intel CPUs since the Pentium MMX have an automatic shutdown
controlled by an on-CPU-chip thermal diode that prevents damage by heat.

I suggest you do a lot more research BEFORE purchasing any new CPU chip.

Phil Weldon

| Hi there again....what is the default volatge for the c2d x6800 extreme
and
| what are the safe temp ranges for it?
|
|



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Thx Phil....I was lucky enough to be given this cpu....I usuall y use
amd....

Thank you for the link...the throttle you mention is that an auto feature?



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



'GreenBean' wrote:
| Thx Phil....I was lucky enough to be given this cpu....I usuall y use
| amd....
|
| Thank you for the link...the throttle you mention is that an auto feature?
_____

The throttle function is automatic if enabled.  See page 75 of the datasheet
( Intel Core 2 Extreme Processor X6800 and Intel Core 2 Duo Desktop
Processor E6000 Sequence Datasheet' reached by the directions I posted
earlier.
( ftp://download.intel.com/design/processor/datashts/31327802.pdf ).

The fail-safe thermal shut-down 'THERMTRIP# is always active and cannot be
disabled.  In practice, the fail-safe thermal shut-down is rarely activated
because the CPU will lock up and cool down long before 'THERMTRIP# is
activated.  'THERMTRIP#' is discussed on page 85 of the same document.

One of the reasons I have always preferred Intel over AMD is the greater
amount of information Intel provides.

Phil Weldon

| Thx Phil....I was lucky enough to be given this cpu....I usuall y use
| amd....
|
| Thank you for the link...the throttle you mention is that an auto feature?
|
|



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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As I'm a longtime AMD user, considering a Conroe for my next build, I have a
somewhat basic question. When I look at pictures of motherboards for the
Core 2 Duo, I don't see anything obvious that would serve as attachment
points for the HSF. Does anybody have a link that shows how the HSF is
attached?



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Peter van der Goes wrote:
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Dear Peter,

if you look at the Lunar Lander like "feet" on this Artic Cooling
Freezer 7 Pro, you can see the prongs that insert into the four holes on
socket 775 motherboards.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?Image=35%2D186%2D134%2D01%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D02%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D03%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D04%2Ejpg&CurImage=35%2D186%2D134%2D01%2Ejpg&Description=ARCTIC+COOLING+Freezer+7+Pro+CPU+Cooler+%2D+Retail

Bottom view:

http://www.newegg.com/Product/ShowImage.asp?Image=35%2D186%2D134%2D01%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D02%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D03%2Ejpg%2C35%2D186%2D134%2D04%2Ejpg&CurImage=35%2D186%2D134%2D01%2Ejpg&Description=ARCTIC+COOLING+Freezer+7+Pro+CPU+Cooler+%2D+Retail

Not my favorite socket 775 feature--in fact, while the prongs/lander
legs have to be pushed down very hard, and I have seen them come loose a
time or two.

A much better solution is the Zalman 9500, no LEDS, but has a four pin
fan adapter so that the motherboard can control the fan speed, and, it
mounts with solid screws, not clips/prongs.

http://www.newegg.com/Product/Product.asp?Item=N82E16835118003

Installation instructions:

http://www.zalman.co.kr/Upload/product/9500AT_eng.PDF

Zalman web info:

http://www.zalman.co.kr/eng/product/view.asp?idx=193&pr_name=CNPS9500%20AT

I have read that the Conroe runs very cool, so the 9500 is no doubt
over-kill, but, would no doubt run very quietly....

HTH,

BC

Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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Thanks for the pics!



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



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Couldn't be simpler. Four holes in the motherboard on a four inch diagonal.
Cooling solution attaches into holes by means of pushpins or bolts etc.
--


Richard Hopkins
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
(replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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So, does that mean changing the CPU requires removal of the motherboard from
its mounts in the case?



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Peter van der Goes wrote:

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Dear Peter,

no, you just rotate the prongs a quart turn counterclockwise, and they
release;  no need to remove motherboard.

BC

Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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Thanks BC!
I was concerned by by Richard's "Cooling solution attaches into holes by
means of pushpins or bolts..."



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



"Peter van der Goes"wrote in message...
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Indeed so. As BC says, the pushpins supplied on the OEM Intel thermal
solutions, and heatsinks like the Freezer Pro simply release if you turn the
head of the pin.

However, many of the aftermarket Socket 775 cooling solutions use
screws/bolts, reverse-side reinforcing plates and other items that *would*
mandate motherboard removal to fit/remove the heatsink assembly and CPU.
Still, as this also applies to the larger AMD-oriented cooling products, it
is to a large degree a moot point.
--


Richard Hopkins
Cardiff, Wales, United Kingdom
(replace nospam with pipex in reply address)

The UK's leading technology reseller www.dabs.com



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide




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I appreciate the information you've provided, and you're correct that many
third party AMD HSF's mount with bolts as well. I just wanted to be sure I
had the option to (dis)mount a HSF without having to remove the motherboard.
I like to tinker :)
Thanks again!



Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide





I only got an E6400 :(

Its only overclocked to 3.2 ghz :(

You mnake me fracking sad and someone gave it to you  :(

I Am going away to cry now :(



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Re: Overclocking Core 2 Duo extreme - guide



Paul

Stock cooling?  Voltage?

bob


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