Cooling Pentium I without fan

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Hello NG,
it's me again. I've managed to get a PC from a friend of mine. It's got
a Pentium I. Is it definitely possible to cool it without a CPU fan?

Thanks, Daniel

Re: Cooling Pentium I without fan



Give more information.  The Pentium (it was never called Pentium I) could be
anything from a Pentium 60 MHz to a Pentium 233.  And then there is the
Pentium MMX which was only made in the higher speeds.  The Pentium 60 and 66
were notorious for producing high temperature (but perhaps that was just the
shock at the power consumption change from the 486; current CPUs certainly
use a lot more power.)

You are actually going to be the person who answers your question.  You've
got the desire, so experiment.  Be aware that it is likely that a Pentium
may be damged (or the motherboard damaged) by overheating.  Frankly, it is
unlikely that anyone else in the world cares whether a Pentium can be run
without a fan.  (I assume you eliminate passive convective water cooling,
heatpipes with passive convective cooling, CPU heatsinks that use the power
supply fan, and the like.)  There are alternative CPUs that are much more
powerful and that use much less power and consequently produce much less
heat [ you do realize that essentially ALL the electrical power consumed by
a CPU is directly emitted as heat power, Watt for Watt?] and could be
expected to operate without fans.

Phil Weldon

| Hello NG,
| it's me again. I've managed to get a PC from a friend of mine. It's got
| a Pentium I. Is it definitely possible to cool it without a CPU fan?
|
| Thanks, Daniel



Re: Cooling Pentium I without fan



Phil Weldon wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Also due to the 60 and 66MHz models running at 5v. Later Pentiums ran on
3.3v, then lower for the MMX versions.
--
~misfit~



Re: Cooling Pentium I without fan



Daniel B=F6hmer wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

For one it depends on which Pentium it is as they came in 60Mhz (socket 5=
)=20
to 200Mhz (socket 7) flavors. Then it depends on how large the heatsink a=
nd=20
  case fan are.

Some Pentium systems used a large 'fanless' heatsink mounted just behind =

the front case fan so that the case fan provided the heatsink cooling=20
airflow (note that this depends on a suitable motherboard and case layout=
).=20
For example, I've still got around here a socket 5 60Mhz Pentium with it'=
s=20
'fanless' heatsink and one for a Pentium 133MHz (both having been replace=
d=20
with faster processor and fanned heatsinks). If the heatsink is large=20
enough and the case fan moves enough air over it you can, in theory at=20
least, cool anything. Compaq, for example, cooled dual 500Mhz Pentium III=
=20
slot-1 processors in their AP500 with 'fanless' heatsinks using ducted ca=
se=20
air over them so the answer is yes, if you design the system properly. Bu=
t=20
you can't just rip the fan off a fanned heatsink and expect it to work.

Btw, and FYI, there is no 'Pentium I." People sometimes use that, or IMO =
a=20
better term "Pentium Classic," to distinguish them from later models but =

Intel never used it; it's simply "Pentium." The 'adders' came later to=20
distinguish *them*, I.E. MMX, II, III, IV.


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