mouse for notebooks

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Why are some mice advertised as "Optical Mouse for Notebooks"

I'd like to buy a Logitech V320 cordless optical mouse, but I'd be using it
on a 22" LCD screen.
Would this make a difference in it's performance?




Re: mouse for notebooks


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Most likely they are "for laptops" because of minuscule size and shorter
connecting cord
Uunless cordless, of course, there are some, usually bluetoothed, because RF
needs the "big receiver"

I, though, use a standard corded "MS Comfort Optical Mouse 3000", as I have
a big enough case for my 17" laptop
(and I feel most "laptop mice" are too small for my hand/grip

--
Tumppi
=================================
A lot learned from these newsgroups
Helsinki, FINLAND
(translations from/to FI not always accurate
=================================





Re: mouse for notebooks


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Sorry, forgot
There is NO other difference than size and length of cord


--
Tumppi
=================================
A lot learned from these newsgroups
Helsinki, FINLAND
(translations from/to FI not always accurate
=================================





Re: mouse for notebooks

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_Some_ of the laptop mice I've seen have higher resolution than
normal, the rationale being that you don't need as much desk space
since the cursor will move at a faster rate.

--
Andrew Smallshaw
andrews@sdf.lonestar.org

Re: mouse for notebooks


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Usually the mice for notebooks are small for portability.  I have
large hands and find notebooks, cell phones, and some remote controls
awkward to use.   You should have no performance issues with a large
screen.  

Re: mouse for notebooks

wrote:

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Performance is usually based on whether it's laser (good) or
with logitech, "invisible light" engine (bad), or old tech
with red LED that has less aggressive low power state
(better usability as it doesn't lag for a millisecond when
you start moving it from a stationary position but also
drains battery(s)faster).

Laptop mice tend to be smaller - check ergonomics at a store
before ordering anything online.

Laptop mice then to have small USB thumbdrive style
receivers (if usb instead bluetooh integral to a notebook)
though newer desktop mice might also instead of the older
corded receiver type.  When they are corded instead of
cordless, the cord "might" be shorter but not necessarily
so.

Often modern cordless mice can have their USB receiver
stowed inside a built-in cavity or snapped onto the bottom.
Sometimes they use only 1 x AA or 2 x AAA (might be some
that use 1 x AAA but I think that wouldn't have good enough
battery life for most people) instead of the more common 2 x
AA cells a desktop mouse would use.  We can probably expect
more laptop mice to use harder to source but smaller Li-Ion
battery packs in the future.

The summary answer might be that a laptop mouse is whatever
the manufacturer feels distinguishes it as such, there is no
one rule about what would differentiate it from a desktop
mouse, except they are almost always medium-small or smaller
sized.  Their performance can vary widely depending on the
sensor tech used, but today most branded (MS or Logitech)
are fairly good.

One thing about that V320 is it does use the optical light
tech, contrary to Logitech's claims it does not track better
than traditional optical mice.  They're splitting hairs -
the sensor has higher DPI than older mice did, but it is far
more picky about the mousing surface so it can't actually
use, perceive most of those DPI unless you try a few
mousepads and use what works best.  Frankly I would much
rather have a laser mouse even though it uses batteries
about 4X as fast (about 1.5 months vs 6 months) then use
rechargable batteries.  It all depends on what you get used
to though, being cordless also lowers performance some.  If
you had a really high performance mouse you tend to get
spoiled and have to stop using it to forget how lesser
performance mice fall short, then you get used to them.
Don't get me wrong the difference is not large if using a
good mousing surface (what's good enough varies per mouse
tech) but if it's enough of a concern to think about it, it
is enough to notice.


Re: mouse for notebooks

Thanks for all that info.... in your opinion what would be the Best Wireless
Mouse for WinXP
and do they make any laser mice for Win98?

What's the best mousing surface, I was looking at Razerzone.com products.






Re: mouse for notebooks

wrote:

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You need to go to a store and try them out for shape - shape
matters more than any other factors.  Next, anything
"laser", and of course if you're a gamer it'll need to have
enough buttons to support your games.

"Best" mousing surface not necessary unless you have a
problem with problems tracking on a typical surface.
Otherwise, size, the slickness you want, ie  - other
asthetic factors will matter.

Beyond that the ideal surface should have a moderately fine
texture (visually), not very light in color,  and only needs
to be the old standard cloth with foam under it if you often
rest your hand on the surface and that makes it more
comfortable than other modern pads with a harder and slicker
(lower friction) surface.  Some pads cost quite a bit, too
much for most people to consider reasonable but if you want
to spend a lot, look at some mouse pad reviews.

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