Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

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I just tried to install my new Thermaltake Pure Power 680 and I am having
some difficulty.  I have an ASUS P4T533 motherboard with a 20pin connector.
The Thermaltake PS has a 24 pin connector that splits to make a 20 and a 4.
I split the connector and put the 20 pin on the main connector leaving the
remaining 4 disconnected.  I then took one of the peripheral connectors and
plugged it into the 12V connector on the mobo.  After connecting all the
rest of the cables I turned on the machine and got nothing but beeps.  It
was continuous short beeping.  I turned off the machine and bought a 24 to
20 pin adapter but I got the same results.  Upon further inspection of the
main connector on the PS I discovered that one of the pins was missing,
however there is no wire to indicate it should be there.  I reinstalled my
old PS and away it went like nothing was wrong.  Could anyone provide some
insight into this?  Thanks for your time.

Lars



Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin


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Maybe it needs -5V ? That would be the missing pin.
The latest standard removes -5V, or at least doesn't require
its presence. The _theory_ is, no motherboard needs it.

Now, why does your board need -5V ?

No idea.

   Paul

Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

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You do NOT need a 24-pin to 20-pin adapter for your power supply.
Are you sure that you plugged in the 4-pin square P4 power connector
located by the AGP slot and CPU socket and NOT the ASUS EZ-PLUG?

---
Kevin Chalker, Owner (KC COMPUTERS)
E-mail: kc@kc-computers.com    Web: www.kc-computers.com
Internet dealer since 1991!!!  See WWW.RESELLERRATINGS.COM!!!



Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

I plugged in the 4 pin 12V connector over between the CPU and the Video
card.  I didn't use the EZ Plug as it was in the way of the clip for the
main connector.  Could anyone tell me what it means when the it just beeps
in short never ending sequence?  Any other ideas?



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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

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The beeping could be caused by a bad connection with the
4-pin P4 12V plug, memory, video card, etc. Try one
RAM module at a time, a different video card, etc.

Are you able to try the power supply with a different computer?

---
Kevin Chalker, Owner (KC COMPUTERS)
E-mail: kc@kc-computers.com    Web: www.kc-computers.com
Internet dealer since 1991!!!  See WWW.RESELLERRATINGS.COM!!!





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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

KC Computers wrote:
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Instead of guessing, just look up the beep codes for that
motherboard/BIOS...

--
spammage trappage: remove the underscores to reply

I'm going to die rather sooner than I'd like. I tried to protect my
neighbours from crime, and became the victim of it. Complications in
hospital following this resulted in a serious illness. I now need a bone
marrow transplant. Many people around the world are waiting for a marrow
transplant, too. Please volunteer to be a marrow donor:
http://www.abmdr.org.au /
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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

When I put the old PS back in the machine there was no problem, it fired up
fine.  I am going to try it in another machine today hopefully.  There are
two four pin 12v connectors on the PS and I tried both same result.


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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

what video card are you using?

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up
the
and
leaving
beeps.
of
provide



Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

Radeon 9700, I have plugged it in as well using one of the FDD connectors
from the PSU.  The FDD is also plugged in.


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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

I followed another poster's suggestion and looked up the beep codes.
Continuous beeping indicates a power supply, mainboard, or keyboard problem.
(I have not encountered that problem yet, myself.)

If you don't have the mainboard's manual, I suggest that you download it:

http://dlsvr03.asus.com/pub/ASUS/mb/sock478/p4t533/e1152_p4t533.pdf

On Page 38, the pinouts for the ATX power connector are given. You can
compare that to the available pins on the connector of the new PS, and see
if the missing one is critical. (None of them are listed as "no
connection".)

Otherwise, a random suggestion: you have two 2X2 12V connectors on the new
PS cable. Try the other one?

I hope that you bought the PS from a source that makes for an easy RMA,
should you need to.

(I admit to some curiosity: why the 680W with an old P4T533? It seems like
it's a lot more PS than you'd need.)

Address scrambled. Replace nkbob with bobkn.

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(snip)



Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin


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One obvious possibility, is that the board is one that tests for/needs
the -5v rail. This has been dropped from the ATX power supply specs, and
new supplies generally won't have it. Some boards ten years old, don't
need it, but some only a year of so old, still do!....

Best Wishes



Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

Thanks again for the great info.  I will try pulling the -5V connection
and then see what happens.  As for the needing a 680W ps, I don't NEED
it but I had a credit at the store and didn't know what else to get.  I
plan on upgrading soon so I thought I would be ready for anything!
Looks like I might have to wait to try it out..


Bob Knowlden wrote:
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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

On Mon, 30 Jan 2006 22:58:43 -0500, "Highspeed"

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You could try temporarily lifting out the -5V connection from the
20-pin molex on your old supply and see if the problem appears. That
would prove or deny whether -5V has anything to do with the problem.
Make sure that the freed-up connector is taped over to avoid any
short-circuit accidents while experimenting.

John Lewis

 


Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

Lewis) wrote:

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An easy way to perform such an experiment, is to purchase a 20 pin
to 20 pin extension cable. Then, cut the -5V wire, and see if the
old supply can still make the motherboard post. You can still
repair the extension cable and reuse it later.

   Paul

Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

On Wed, 01 Feb 2006 19:15:51 GMT, nospam@needed.com (Paul)
wrote:


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It does not seem at all likely that the board isn't working
due to lack of -5V.  Far more likely the power supply either
doesn't have the correct connectors or they aren't being
plugged into the right place.  Either that, or something a
bit simplier like the 110/220 voltage switch set in the
wrong position.  I admit I didn't read the entire thread
thoroughly and so I have only a certral point to make as
first written, that odds are the lack of -5V is not a
problem, it would be noteworthy and extremely unique if it
is the problem.

Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

The power supply supports ATX 2.2 and others.  The one comment you make
here is regarding the 110/220 voltage selector.  This particular PS
does not have one of those, it is supposed to have smart switching
technology that automatically selects the voltage.  Also could the fact
that this motherboard requires a special RDRAM have something to do
with this problem?  Never thought it would be a problem.


kony wrote:
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Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin


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The motherboard is an RDRAM antique, with no clear information
in the user manual as to whether it uses -5V for anything or not.
The experiment that I have suggested is totally trivial. It is very
easy to disengage the -5 v contact in the molex connector by gently
pressing the spring retainers back with a sharp point. Then tape
the freed connector to avoid it making contact with anything
vital while checking whether its removal made any difference.
A simple reverse procedure to reinstate the contact.

No need to waste the effort typing an unscientific justification for
doing nothing.

John Lewis


Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin

On Thu, 02 Feb 2006 18:18:53 GMT, john.dsl@verizon.net (John
Lewis) wrote:


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Was not a justification for doing nothing, I was thinking
past this experiement which is not expected to work (ie-
that it's not likely the board needs -5V)  and suggesting
more focus on the board connectors present and the
suitability of the PSU in question, what it's connectors
supply.

Nobody's stopping him from doing the experiment but then
what?  Better to have more than one idea of things to try
while he has the opportunity to try them rather than coming
back after every little attempt for further feedback.

Re: Thermaltake Power Supply and 24pin


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having
connector.
a 4.
the
connectors and
the
It
24 to
the
missing,
reinstalled my
some
I had a problem when I built a K7M system about 6 years ago. I was using
a new Sparkle (Fortron) 300w PS. I kept getting intermittent beeps and
failure to boot problems. Finally after most of my hair was gone, I
discovered that one of the leads in the 20 pin power connector wasn't
seated properly and would disconnect any time the cable was touched.

I reseated the pin in the plug and that fixed the problem. Now, I check
the pins in the 20 pin plugs on every PS I install.

Chas.



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