Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

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Hi,

I am getting some shoulder pain when using my pc.

I am thinking of swapping the keyboard for a minikeyboard that does
not have the key pad.

Has anyone any experience of using the minikeyboard?

Does it have any disadvantages?

Thanks.

A

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

species8350 wrote:
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  My job calls for me to use a keyboard and mouse most of the day so arm
an wrist comfort are very important to me. I haven't used a
mini-keyboard unless you count lap top keyboards in the mix, which I am
not fond of by the way.

However I have found that a keyboard tray that allows lowering the
keyboard so that the your forearms are lower than your elbows helps
immensely. I also prefer a keyboard that doesn't require me to hold my
fingers higher than my wrists. My guess is that blood flow is improved
and therefor less likely to lead to fatigue. That may sound superficial
and unscientific but it works for me.

John

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

species8350 wrote:
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Not clear how removing some keys will help anything?
Is there more to it than that?
And what's the "mini" mean?  If it means that the keys
are closer together, you might find that a problem
depending on the size of your hands.
The problem I have with mini keyboards and laptops is
not the size, but that they're just different.  Your fingers
learn where the keys are.  When I change to the laptop,
the keys are not spaced the same and my fingers press
in the wrong places and my brain takes a while to catch up.

I second the suggestion that making the keyboard lower
can help.  But then, you need to do something with the mouse.
My solution was to get rid of the mouse entirely and use a touchpad
placed just in front of the space bar...and lowering the whole
thing so my hands aren't higher than my elbows.  Lots less stress
on the wrists.

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard


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My problem with laptops (and mini-keyboards?) is that so many of them
have no depressions in the keys.  Until I tried a laptop like that, I
didn't realize how much I relied on the depressions to keep track of
which key I was hitting, and if I were hitting two at the same time.
(Same as until I tried to play an organ, I didnt' realize how I relied
on features of piano keyboards to keep track of the same things)

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Sometimes I just rub the ball-less mouse on my thigh, rather than lift
my arm higher.  Sometimes I put the keyboard on my lap, which is
similar.  I haven't figured out yet how to keep both of these things
on my knees, but I know enough keyboard shortcuts that I can spend
quite a bit of time without using the mouse.

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

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Thanks for responding

There is no facility for a keyboard tray, and in any event I need to
see the keys as I am typing.

The point is if I obtain a mini keyboard the numeric keypad will be
missing, hence I can move my arms closer to the keyboard. I believe
that this will help with my discofort in the right shoulder.

I use a left hand mouse.

I haven' though much about the 'key depressions'. Not sure if they
would make much of a difference. But I will take this point into
account.

The main keyboard would be the same size as my original keyboard, but
would not have a keypad. Thought to be more ergonomic

Best wishes

A

Ps. Chain and table are non-adjustable

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

species8350 wrote:
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I just can't visualize this.  Every keyboard I've seen has the keypad on
the right side.  Removing it would not allow me to move the keyboard
closer to me.
???????
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If your health is at stake, consider modifying one or both of those.

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

species8350 wrote:
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Don't know what you mean by chain? Surely your employer unlocks the
chain occasionally? ;)

Modern trays look like this:

http://www.versatables.com/pages/keyboard-trays.php?gclid=COqYldaym6YCFU1-5Qod0xd6nA

As you can see, mouse can be left or right hand and the tray itself is
what is adjustable.

John

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

In message

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I'm confused here, but keyboards have the numeric keypad on the right,
so how would removing it help if you use a left-handed mouse?

Or are you using a left-handed mouse in your right hand?

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

On Jan 2, 11:30=A0am, DevilsPGD <Still-Just-A-Rat-In-A-
C...@crazyhat.net> wrote:
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The point or having a keyboard without the keypad is that it would
allow me to move my right arm closer to the keyboard (when resting). I
think that this might help with my right shoulder problem (strain).

I use a left handed mouse on the left.

A tray could not be fitted even if I wanted one. There is a
crossmember under the table.

I tried raising myself by using a cushion. But I was not comfortable.
I lacked the support of the chair.

I am looking for the simplest solution. I use the table for both
computing activites and for reading/writing. Hence, I don't want to be
constantly moving the monitor (back and forth).

How do you relax your arms when not typing?

Thanks.

A

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

species8350 wrote:
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A chair with arm rests also helps considerably even when you are not
typing. Sounds like you should go furniture shopping, your body will
thank you.

John

Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard

On Sun, 2 Jan 2011 04:35:47 -0800 (PST), species8350

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Okay, I get it now.  I actually dislocated my right shoulder about 30
times between age 17 and 29, and had surgery when I was 29.  I can see
what a good job the guy did since I have no trouble with the mouse to
the right of the full size keyboard.
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But now you've lost me on your situation. I do more my arm to the
right for the mouse, but for the keys, my hands are in front of the
keyboard and never go to the numeric keys (except once a month or so
when I have more than 20 numbers in a row and I use them.)
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This sounds like my specialty.  Loosen the cross member from the table
and slip some L or C shaped piece of flat metal in to hold the tray.
Then retighten the cross member.

WRT not seeing teh keys, I don't understand where that came from.
Even with a tray, the tray comes out and one can see the keys just
fine.  I don't know what keeps the tray from retreating when you rest
the heels of your hands on the keyboard front, however.
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I hate cushions.   Hate hate hate.  Sometimes I try to let them stay
there when I sit on someone's sofa, but within a few seconds I have to
get rid of them.  Cushions to sit on are bad too, except for the
originally designed permanent cushion.  Cushions are bad because they
are are hard to spell, too.   Cution, cusion, ... why do you need an s
*and* a t, for gosh sakes.   Why isn't it like motion or caution?

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My desk chair broke a couple weeks ago. It had armrests and I think I
used them a lot.  Now I'm using the standard metal folding card table
chair, the kind with the curved, depressed back and the depressed
seat, and the round pipes.  The most common design.    

I've never had a keyboard tray. I have a fancy wooden desk with a
middle drawer and three drawers on each side that my friend found
discarded on the curb a few blocks from Wall Street, about 30 years
ago.  He called me, then stood by the desk until I got there with my
convertible and took it home.  Unfortuantely the plate glass cover had
been broken, but otherwise it was good.

I rest the keyboard on the middle drawer of the desk, which is only
about an inch lower than the desktop, which is standard height.
Sometimes I slouch in the chair then I rest my my wrists on my
recently big belly.  Whether I slouch or not, i rest my hand heels on
the front part of the keyboard (right now I'm using a standard
Microsoft Multi-media keyboard with a slightly rounded front.  I use
it just because it has volume, mute, and sleep buttons that I like,
but I've used several other keyboards the same way. I'm not in love
with microsoft. I buy whatever I find cheap at hamfests. )

My forearms go down 4 or 5 inches to my elbows and my hands bend at
the wrist to make my hands almost horizontal.  

Hmmm it might be even easier without the armrests, because when I move
my arm to reach the arrow keys, I wonder if the armrest was in the
way.  But I'm going to replace the folding chair with a reclining,
revolving, armed desk chair soon, even though the folding chair is
pretty comfortable.

Our bodies may be different so I don't know if any of this helps you.

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Re: Minikeyboard vs. Traditional keyboard


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1.  These features seem to get the ergonomics backwards.   The original
problem,  "shoulder pain when using my pc." is best remedied
by finding a body position that does not cause this pain, then
finding furniture that supports a painless body position.   Us of a
standard-sized keyboard without keypad promises no benefit.
(Office supply stores nowadays carry chairs and desks that are
both adjustable for this purpose.)

2.  It would be advantageous to learn the standard keyboard.   Any
"need to see the keys" when typing is like needing to see the
gear lever when driving a car.

--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)





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