Laptop hard drive - recovery

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I have an HP laptop here and the best I can do for a model is "HP Mini".
The hard drive is shot. I ran chkdsk from Hiren's Boot CD. I took about an
hour and found several "unrecovorable" sectors and "fixed" a whole bunch of
indexes. It still won't boot.

The recovery partition appears to be intact and is accessible. but when
attempting to restore it to factory defaults, it hangs on formatting the
hard drive.

I have another hard drive here to put in it but no installation CD. It is
Windows 7 Starter Edition. It is frustrating to have that restore partition
on the bad drive and not be able to use it.

Or does somebody know a trick?

--
                    --- Long live Fat32! ---

Re: Laptop hard drive - recovery

Menno Hershberger wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Copy the recovery partition from one drive to the other ?

If you have a copy of something like Partition Magic, maybe
that would work. Personally, if I was doing it, I'd copy everything,
because some of those setups have custom MBR approaches and stuff
hidden in various places.

*******

Perhaps another way to do it, is attempt a sector by sector copy, of
every sector that's "willing to come along".

1) Buy a replacement drive which is the same size or bigger than the original.
    You'll also need a desktop computer with enough space on it, to hold
    the entire laptop drive. Alternately, if you own two USB to laptop drive
    adapters, you can do the transfer disk-to-disk and not need temporary
    storage on the desktop.

2) Get a copy of ddrescue, which has the ability to skip over bad sectors.
    Then, just copy everything that's visible. You say the recovery partition
    is intact, so it should copy OK.

3) Now, slave up the replacement drive, and copy everything ddrescue managed
    to get. If the recovery partition is in good shape, and enough of the
    essential stuff for booting got copied, then perhaps you can initiate
    a recovery when the new drive is placed back in the laptop.

Antonio Diaz's GNU 'ddrescue', mentioned here. Use it with some Linux LiveCD.

http://www.cgsecurity.org/wiki/Damaged_Hard_Disk

(Source - needs to be compiled)
http://download.savannah.gnu.org/releases/ddrescue/ddrescue-1.15-pre1.tar.gz

I didn't grab one of the .lz links, because I don't have any tools to open
one of those. Even my copy of 7ZIP couldn't do it. That's why I grabbed the
tar.gz one instead.

Running Ubuntu 10.10 in a virtual machine, this is what I tried.

1) Use Firefox in Ubuntu, to download ddrescue-1.15-pre1.tar.gz
2) mkdir build
3) mv ddrescue-1.15-pre1.tar.gz build/
4) cd build
5) gzip -c -d ddrescue-1.15-pre1.tar.gz | tar xf -
6) cd ddrescue-1.15-pre1
7) ./configure
8) make -n                  (This shows what steps will happen in the Make)
9) make
10) Oopsy! No c++ compiler in Ubuntu. Go to System : Administration : Synaptic
     Package Manager and enter c++ in the search box. Scroll down to g++, right
     click and select "Mark For Install". Then click Apply. It will download
     three packages, of about 10MB total. This installs g++, and an alias of
     c++. Now I have a c++ compiler (which should have been there by default).
11) Now, try the "make" again.
12) Works. Done. No compile errors.
13) Now try:     ./ddrescue --help
14) That should show you the command line options.
15) The cgsecurity web page recommends this recipe. The # lines are comments.
     Don't type in the # lines. Enter the commands in a terminal window.
     (Applications : Accessories : Terminal). You've been doing the entire
     steps 2 through 15 in a Terminal window - sorry for forgetting to mention
     it :-)

     # first, grab most of the error-free areas in a hurry:
     ./ddrescue -n /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log
     # then try to recover as much of the dicy areas as possible:
     ./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/old_disk /dev/new_disk rescued.log

     You could alter that recipe as follows. On your desktop machine, make
     sure you have an NTFS or EXT2 partition available. One big enough to hold
the
     entire contents of the old laptop drive. In Ubuntu, go to Places : Computer
     and look at the partitions offered. Say you prepared an NTFS partition in
     Windows, gave it a label in Disk Management. If the label shows up in the
     Ubuntu file browser, and you click on it, it'll be mounted. Ubuntu
     mounts such partitions R/W, so you can immediately get to work.

16) Go back to the terminal window. Use the "df" command. In this
     example, perhaps /media/sda1 is my huge partition.

     /dev/sda1   blocks used available Mounted on: /media/sda1

     You could dump the broken disk to a file, rather than to a whole drive.
     Here, my assumption is that /home/ubuntu is a partition which can handle
     files larger than 4GB. The entiredisk.dd is a copy of all the sectors. To
     test this in my virtual machine, I inserted a CD as /dev/sr0 as a block
     device to test with, and the ddrescue program dumped the declared size of
the
     CD as the entiredisk.dd file. Now, I'm going to run the second command, but
     it should have nothing to do, because my test transfer was faultless. If
     sectors are missed by the first command, the second command tries to get
     them.

     ./ddrescue -n   /dev/sr0  /home/ubuntu/entiredisk.dd  rescued.log
     ./ddrescue -r 1 /dev/sr0  /home/ubuntu/entiredisk.dd  rescued.log

     OK, if the file size of entiredisk.dd looks good, you could either
     cable up the new laptop drive (with a USB to SATA adapter or whatever),
     or you could shut down the Ubuntu CD entirely (throwing away your copy
     of ddrescue and the g++ compiler in the process), but getting to keep
     the entiredisk.dd file, which was safely written to your huge partition
     (/home/ubuntu in the above example, but it could equally be
/media/mywindowspartition
     or the like).

17) Boot Ubuntu again. Go to Places : Computer, and click the partition
     storing the entiredisk.dd file. Now it's time to write to the brand
     new laptop drive, which is /dev/sdb in this example.

     dd if=/home/ubuntu/entiredisk.dd of=/dev/sdb

     How can you tell where /dev/sdb is ? You can

     ls /dev

     and see what hd or sd devices are present. You could use

     dmesg

     and see storage devices as they're being discovered.

     In any case, the regular "dd" command, should be sufficient to copy
     entiredisk.dd to the new laptop hard drive. When finished, shut down
     Ubuntu again (power off). Disconnect the new laptop drive and reinstall
     it. In theory, when you boot the laptop, it's going to have recovery
     capability. The "dd" command in step 17, runs at about 13MB/sec,
     so you'll need to be patient. If you understand how to enter a
     block_size (bs) and block_count (count) parameter, the command
     can be made to run faster.

I'm sure the above is of no use to you, but that's how I'd do it.
I have that stack of Linux CD's after all :-)

HTH,
      Paul

Re: Laptop hard drive - recovery


Quoted text here. Click to load it
 
It seems that the recovery partition is corrupt as well. As a matter of
fact, it won't boot from it anymore. I tried to just copy the content of
it to a portable drive with Hiren, but it hung up on sector number
something or another. I'll just have to order a recovery CD or have the
customer order one himself.
Thanks for the ideas. It would have been fun to get it accomplished. If
it had worked then I'd know what to do the next time.

--
                    --- Long live Fat32! ---

Re: Laptop hard drive - recovery

Contact HP and see if you buy a Recovery CD

peter



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"Menno Hershberger"  wrote in message

I have an HP laptop here and the best I can do for a model is "HP Mini".
The hard drive is shot. I ran chkdsk from Hiren's Boot CD. I took about an
hour and found several "unrecovorable" sectors and "fixed" a whole bunch of
indexes. It still won't boot.

The recovery partition appears to be intact and is accessible. but when
attempting to restore it to factory defaults, it hangs on formatting the
hard drive.

I have another hard drive here to put in it but no installation CD. It is
Windows 7 Starter Edition. It is frustrating to have that restore partition
on the bad drive and not be able to use it.

Or does somebody know a trick?

--
                    --- Long live Fat32! ---


Re: Laptop hard drive - recovery


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yup. Guess I'm gonna have to. :-)

--
-- I'm retired. I was tired yesterday. I'm tired again today --


--
                    --- Long live Fat32! ---

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