WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7 - Page 6

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Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


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To get windows 7 to work with shares from xp, or samba, import the
registry keys ...
https://bugzilla.samba.org/attachment.cgi?id=4988&action=view

See http://wiki.samba.org/index.php/Windows7 for details.

Regards, Dave Hodgins

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Change nomail.afraid.org to ody.ca to reply by email.
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use in usenet. Feel free to use it yourself.)

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 2010-12-22, Steel <""> wrote:
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    Linux most certainly is putting money in your pocket. It's just doing
so by actually being useful rather than being an example of the "broken
window fallacy". Linux and Unix in general is what people run when they
need stuff to work without compromise or fail. You don't see it because
it is not the squeaky wheel.

    The same is true of the real VMS too.

    Your livelihood might depend on some PICK database too and you would
never know it.

--
    If some college kid can replicate your "invention" without seeing   |||
any of the details of your patent then you have been granted a patent  / | \
on the "idea" and not the actual implementation.

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


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Or, not even use a PC and go back to pencil and paper. About as
practical as Linux.

Merry Xmas Norm,

RL

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


On Tue, 21 Dec 2010 22:41:15 -0500, Steel

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In the case of xphome it's 5 and 9x it's unlimited. 9x hasn't been
deliberately nobbled like the others. Perhaps they were after writing
decent software in those days rather than looking to fleece you out of
all your cash on the pretext that you're getting a better product if
it's able to deal with lots of concurrent connections.


Jim

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/24/2010 6:15 AM, James Egan wrote:

<snipped>

<yawn>

Do you think I care about anything you have to say?

I simply don't care. You showed me what you are made of, and I don't
want to have anything to do with you.

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 06:40:06 -0500, Steel

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In other words you don't have an alternative reason as to why 9x
allowed hundreds of concurrents connections and later workstation
o/s's allowed 10 or less? That's probably it, methinks.

The fact of the matter is if they didn't nobble the workstation
versions like they do then lots of users would use the workstation
versions instead of the server versions leading to less cash$$ for
microsoft.



Jim


Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/24/2010 12:04 PM, James Egan wrote:

<yawn>

<snipped your babble I didn't read it>

See ya I don't want to be ya.

goodbye

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


On Fri, 24 Dec 2010 12:49:07 -0500, Steel

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(again)

Lol.!

You keep threatening to go away and leave everyone in peace but can
never quite manage it. :)

Keep taking the tablets, D.



Jim

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/24/2010 11:45 PM, James Egan wrote:

<snipped your not read babble>

<yawn>

See ya I wouldn't want to be ya.

<bye>

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7


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Huh? Want to explain that statement above to me.

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Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/21/2010 10:44 PM, Peter Foldes wrote:
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Yeah, I want to see this explanation too of what is an 'ordinary O/S'. :)


Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 21/12/2010 10:44 PM, Peter Foldes wrote:
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I think he means it doesn't have the fancy GUI, wi-fi capability, music
and video, and other such toys and candy.

HTH
Wolf K.

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7



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| You can run a server, or a lot of servers, on an ordinary OS.
| They are just applications like the file server software.
| A "server OS" is usually just a stripped down ordinary OS.

No.  A Server OS is geared towards the optimal serving up of services.  This can
be File,
Print, Directory (X.500), etc.  The hardware and the OS is optimzed to handle
numerous
requests and the queing of those requests based upon a prioritization concept.
There are
Dedicated Serrver OS' and there are Non-Dedicated Server OS.  While there may be
similarities in a workstation OS and a Server OS, to categorize a server OS as
"...just a
stripped down ordinary OS" is not true.  If anything it is tthe opposite.  A
workstation
OS is a stripped down version of a server OS but that really isn't true either.
Take
Windows as an example.  A Windows OS may only be abble to handle 10 clients
accessing
service it is providing while a server OS can handle hundreds or thousands.

--
Dave
Multi-AV Scanning Tool - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On comp.os.linux.setup, David H. Lipman

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A server OS is basically a stripped-down regular OS.

I don't know where you got the idea that "serving up of services"
is some kind of big deal.

I run a webserver here. Know what was involved? Installing it and
tweaking my firewall. 5 minutes. The ordinary Linux OS has all
the utilities needed for a 'server OS'.

I think you've never even looked at the filelist of a 'server OS'.`

Sid


Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/21/2010 11:37 PM, Sidney Lambe wrote:
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It a beefed up version on an O/S workstation vs server O/S
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http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Service-oriented_architecture

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LOL! This person no more knows what he/she is talking about than the man
in the moon.  :) He using Linux, and all of a sudden, he's an expert's
expert on computer O/S(s). :)

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

Big Steel wrote:
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   This coming from a guy who set his router password to 12345678...

--
Norman
Registered Linux user #461062
AMD64X2 6400+ Ubuntu 8.04 64bit

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/22/2010 8:05 AM, Norman Peelman wrote:
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The was the Droid 3g hotspot. I have not used a router in years.


Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

Sidney Lambe wrote:
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Stripped down in the sense that a lot of 'fluff' is removed. They are
geared more for throughput. It might not have to do a lot of things,
most general purpose computers do, but what it does, it should do
quickly and accurately.


Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 12/21/2010 11:59 PM, FromTheRafters wrote:
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That would be Android or Windows 7 phone. :)

However, what you are talking about is a server O/S or workstation O/S
for that matter that is a gateway computer hosting a software firewall
solution, where components such as services of the O/S have been
shutdown and other fluff removed.

As far as a Web server that's serving services or a business workstation
O/S that's serving up services in SOA to the client consuming those
services, they are not using cut-down versions of the O/S.

Re: WiFi security issues? Newbie ? for W7

On 22/12/2010 4:49 AM, Big Steel wrote:
[...]
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AIUI, that _is_ the OS. All the rest is add-ons.

I recall OS/2 "red box", which was a server OS. It ran Windows as a
client on a virtual network. Used TCP/IP _within_ the machine.

Wolf K.

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