Trojan Zombie - Page 4

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Re: Trojan Zombie





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| Given the crap people have thrown at me about my practices might I mention
| that iso alcohol is a bad choice for cleaning just about everything
| electronics related because it's 30% water.

| The only thing I use iso for is cleaning the gunk from the insides of
| mechanical mice -- the rollers, trackball, etc.


That is correct.  isopropynal is isoprpyl alcohol and water.  You should use
isoprpyl
alcohol with the least content of water.  That which you buy in a supermarket
for cleaning
wounds has too much water.  That which is commonly used in "Dry Gas" is safe.

But you can NOT say that that is is bad for "...cleaning just about everything
electronics
related."

It is a "proper" cleaning fluid.
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Isopropyl_alcohol


--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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Uhh, No. Not if you use the hospital grade stuff; 91% pure alcohol. Good
for optics and electronics; as it leaves no residue and doesn't "corrode"
components. Your facts are very much in error, sir. :)
 
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You must be using the stuff for sore muslces. Honestly, after reading your
methods for the last couple of days; you would have been fired from my last
bench technician job. We had summer interns who knew more... :(


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




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Most people are not going to use 91+ iso.  They're going to use the cheap
stuff from Safeway.  

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I NEVER said anything about "corroding" anything.  Why do you continue to
quote me as saying things I've never said?  


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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Anyone who understands the value of a good cleaning should be using the
good stuff. If they don't, they need to be in another line of work.
Electronics/optics in general isn't for them.
 
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I didn't say you did claim it would corrode anything, David. I didn't infer
the quote to you either; I was quoting it for a point, actually. But the
idea that the proper grade iso isn't suitable for electronics cleaning is
most certainly an error on your part.


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




| sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in


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| Anyone who understands the value of a good cleaning should be using the
| good stuff. If they don't, they need to be in another line of work.
| Electronics/optics in general isn't for them.

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| I didn't say you did claim it would corrode anything, David. I didn't infer
| the quote to you either; I was quoting it for a point, actually. But the
| idea that the proper grade iso isn't suitable for electronics cleaning is
| most certainly an error on your part.


+1


--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie




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I once successfully cleaned a TV set with a garden hose. The main
problem with the set was electrostatic attraction of dust in an oil
heated household (resulting in a lightning storm on the flyback - and
guck everywhere). Of course this isn't a suitable method by any means,
and older TVs used cardboard for the coil structures and would not have
survived such treatment.

I worked for a number of years at factory repair (mostly car stereos),
and if there was *any* evidence of water damage then replacement was the
only option. Water is worse than a furniture polish spritzed
featherduster - but that doesn't mean it doesn't work.

(Freon is pretty amazing stuff for cleaning electronic circuits)



Re: Trojan Zombie



David Kaye wrote:
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That's the cheap version,
a better concentration 90% (10%water)
can be had for slightly more expense
and it tends to evaporate with far less residue.
Got use to using for tape head cleaning it in place of trichlorethylene
back in the days of Studer Revox.

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I clean the ball of the trackball with my T shirt ;-)

Re: Trojan Zombie




| @yahoo.com says...


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| Most of the dust we find in computers appears to be from construction
| being done in the areas, dirt from the bottom of shoes that gets stirred
| up as people walk across a floor and then pet/people hair.

| Placing the computer above 20" seems to eliminate 90% of the dust
| problem caused by floor traffic.

It is amazing how much dirtier the inside of a chassis can get when it sits on a
carpeted
floor.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie



says...
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I've been telling friends and customers, for decades, to keep computers
and anything with a fan at least 20" above the floor to keep from having
it collect dust.

--
You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.  
Trust yourself.
spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)

Re: Trojan Zombie




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In my experience the dustiest computers are owned by families with young kids.
 Young kids aparently shed a LOT of skin, and the dusty tends to be quite
oily.

Oddly enough, one of the cleanest computers I saw was an 8-year old Dell 8400
or 8300 or something in there, which was working fulltime in a metal shop.  
The owner was careful about his own health and had installed an air lock kind
of thing (a small ante-room with a second door and intense weather stripping
on both doors).  

The only thing odd I noticed was some red powder around the case.  Very
puzzled I asked if he'd maybe spilled some kind of chemical.  He thought about
it and then remembered that his kid had come in and was mixing powdered
Kool-Aid and had spilled the powder over everything.  


Re: Trojan Zombie





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| In my experience the dustiest computers are owned by families with young kids.
|  Young kids aparently shed a LOT of skin, and the dusty tends to be quite
| oily.

| Oddly enough, one of the cleanest computers I saw was an 8-year old Dell 8400
| or 8300 or something in there, which was working fulltime in a metal shop.
| The owner was careful about his own health and had installed an air lock kind
| of thing (a small ante-room with a second door and intense weather stripping
| on both doors).

| The only thing odd I noticed was some red powder around the case.  Very
| puzzled I asked if he'd maybe spilled some kind of chemical.  He thought about
| it and then remembered that his kid had come in and was mixing powdered
| Kool-Aid and had spilled the powder over everything.


The worst are NOT home computers for families with kids.  Families with pets.
Especially
cats.  Shedding hair is drawn into the system.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie




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Those must be the clients I avoid.  I turn down clients I don't want to deal
with or who question my rate.  I seldom deal with clients with pets of any
consequence.  


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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You don't deal with people who question your rate? Your slightly concerning
man. I hope your not one of those wannabe techs who I have to clean up
after...


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




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That's correct.  If I detect hesitation I tell them thanks anyway, but I'm not
interested.  I charge good money for good service.  I give a 60 day guarantee
on my work.  I give free phone support (within reason) after the job.  I
refuse to bargain with people.  

It's not ego at play here, either.  It's experience.  People who hesitate
about the price will never be happy.  They'll watch the clock.  They'll ask if
what I'm doing is really necessary.  They'll hover, they'll question
everything.  And their checks bounce.  

Or ask any restauranteur who's done the 2-for-1 coupons.  They bring in the
bottom feeders.  People who shop for price give you 90% of the headaches.

I've had my current "take a hike" policy for about 7 of the past 9 years.  
Since then I've had only one check bounce out of a couple thousand, and the
guy apologized and paid me back within a couple days.  On those rare occasions
when I bill out (net 30) I usally get paid within 15 days.  

I learned this when I was in the telephone call center (answering service)
business years ago.  I hired only the best telephone operators and charged
nearly double what our competitors charged.  My company was called Pacific
Answering and it was legendary in San Francisco.  It served as the basis for
Proxy Message Centers, a national call center company that was backed by
Federal Express.  

Anyhow, we violated every rule in the books about answering services.  First,
we wouldn't sign up doctors.  Doctors are the bread and butter of answering
services.  But I found them difficult to work with, they didn't pay their
bills on time, they dicked me about prices, and they bitched about everything.
 I hired only the best employees and didn't want to subject them to bad
customers.  

Besides being legendary for our high prices and our refusal to put doctors on
the service, we were legendary for our service.  We would do anything within
our power to get the message to the client.  If we'd gotten wong info from a
caller, such as a wrong callback number, we'd go to extreme lengths to make it
right, and it was policy that if we mangled the message badly we'd give an
entire month of service free.  And anybody in the company was authorized to do
this.  

And, no, I wouldn't fire someone if they messed up.  I realized they were
trying to do their best.  Yeah, once in awhile we ate it with our guarantee,
but people loved us so much that they'd often refuse to accept the free month!

Thus, Pacific Answering had customers such as CBS, Wells Fargo, Bank of
America, Eller Outdoor Advertising, TV Guide, etc.  

Well, that same standard of excellence I used in building Pacific is what I
apply to my current business.  And the first order of business is that I send
the bottom feeders elsewhere.  


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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Sounds fair enough.
 
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Very true in most cases, from the experiences I've had as well.
 
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I would have to agree there too.
 
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Makes sense.
 
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Wow. Are you taking business ideas from gmc or something? /joking.
 
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Sounds like a sound business model of sorts...


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




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However, I'm in a quandary.  I can either keep what I'm doing, or I can
expand.  I happen to love doing tech support, but if I expanded I'd become a
manager.   While I have no problem managing people (at at my height had 39
employees) it would take me away from doing tech.  I'm basically in the same
boat as David Filo from Yahoo.  He prefers to do tech than run a company.  

However, I do have capital available should I wish to become the next Geek
Squad.  So, it's tempting.


Re: Trojan Zombie



David H. Lipman wrote:
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Awhile back I came across what seemed a good deal on a Sony multi-disk CD
player in a thrift shop for around eight dollars, problem was that it would
start to play then go into a stuttering hang up. After opening it to have a
look see I found a cat hair (longhair white Persian) that had gotten caught in
the gear lube and wrapped around the laser head restricting its travel.
Removed it and did a thorough inspection to remove any others as well as
vacuum it out and it still works to this day.

Re: Trojan Zombie




| David H. Lipman wrote:

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| Awhile back I came across what seemed a good deal on a Sony multi-disk CD
| player in a thrift shop for around eight dollars, problem was that it would
| start to play then go into a stuttering hang up. After opening it to have a
| look see I found a cat hair (longhair white Persian) that had gotten caught in
| the gear lube and wrapped around the laser head restricting its travel.
| Removed it and did a thorough inspection to remove any others as well as
| vacuum it out and it still works to this day.

Yes, quite common.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie



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I pulled about seven acorns out of a customer's multi-CD player once. Of
course I included them in the 'old parts' package I sent back to him. It
was from his garage and he sent it in because it would no longer accept
the cartridges. I figured it would be self-explanatory upon receipt.



Re: Trojan Zombie



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::chuckle::

 Other than finding dead lizards and mice inside TV's, I think my best
 one was finding half of a peanut butter and jelly sandwich in a VHS
 VCR. Customer couldn't understand why it wouldn't accept tapes any
 more. After cleaning it up, I called them to let them know it was
 "ready for pickup". Mom showed up with a little blond haired angel at
 her side. When she asked what was wrong with it, I handed her a ziplock
 with the sandwich in it and told her it simply needed to have the
 previous "tape" removed. She looked at the bag for a moment, then
 looked down at her daughter who was beaming up at her with a huge
 smile. Always wished I had a picture of that. One of those "priceless"
 moments.



--
Don't bother trying to
contact me via email.

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