Trojan Zombie - Page 2

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Re: Trojan Zombie




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Smarter but sometimes too smart for their own good.  People do tend to latch
onto the scare of the day.  Lately it's cookies.  They don't wan'em so I turn
them off, then they phone and tell me that EBay doesn't remember them
anymore...

Oh, and registry "cleaners".  Many of my customers have these.  I remove all
of them except CCleaner (which is the only one that doesn't scare the bejeebus
out of me).  I tell them that they don't need registry cleaners or any other
"tools".  I tell them to phone me first before installing  some kind of
"helper".


Re: Trojan Zombie




| Nope, the recession hasn't hit me at all.  In fact, a few months ago I raised
| my prices.  I have found that my business has shifted from 95% malware removal
| to about 40% today.  The rest is hardware, networking, setup, etc.  I chalk
| that up to Windows being more stable.

| Yesterday's agenda was a misconfigured router that couldn't connect to the
| Internet, networking a printer, malware removal, and a firewall problem
| prevening file sharing.


As I was in my lab cleaning dust from sveral notebooks, I mentioned this thread
to my
peers that were present.

We all had a hearty laugh about the use of compressed air bending fins/blades
and about
using Furniture Polish on a duster.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie




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People have reacted in horror to seeing body shop people jump on bumpers to
straighten them, too, just like I react in horror when someone starts a
barbecue fire with a petroleum fire starter instead of newspapers and
kindling.  

I have only stated what I've experienced about the fan blades.  It was a bitch
taking the laptop apart and removing the mother board to get at the bent fan
blade.  I couldn't very well charge for my time on that one.  As I recall I
ate about 1 1/2 extra hours on that job, when I lost a couple screws and
didn't have replacements.  I was all over the carpet with my magnet trying to
find them.  I never used compressed air again.  

And as for the feather duster, I go for what works for the least amount of
hassle.  Again, as an alternative I suggested the microfibre cloths available
at any Walgreen's if you're squeamish about feather dusters.  

I'm not going to get terribly worried about "corrosion" of cheap sheet metal
enclosures and mouting bays from a the use of a feather duster if removing the
dust helps keep things from overheating.  And no circuit board is going to
suffer from a once-over with a feather duster, either, as long as it's
grounded and I'm grounded.  




Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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Oh God.. Okay, I've got to stop reading; I am getting a terrible mental
picture of some redneck in a backwoods shop someplace "fixin" a laptop.
LOL!

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hmm... Well, I hope you carry good liability insurance in the event your
sued for damaging someones equipment. God forbid you cause data loss
doing something stupid.


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




| sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in


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| Oh God.. Okay, I've got to stop reading; I am getting a terrible mental
| picture of some redneck in a backwoods shop someplace "fixin" a laptop.
| LOL!

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| hmm... Well, I hope you carry good liability insurance in the event your
| sued for damaging someones equipment. God forbid you cause data loss
| doing something stupid.


Bwahahahahahahahaha.............   :-)



--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie




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I have a good errors and omissions policy.  I've never had to use it.


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in news:hsfilf$u1i$1
@news.eternal-september.org:

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That uhh, policy doesn't mean a "hill of beans". You do have liability
insurance don't you?


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




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It's part of my umbrella policy.  Okay, you're asking all the questions: What  
kind of insurance do YOU have and what are the premiums on it?  What is the
limit?  Tell us.


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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I *had* (when I did it for myself under my own employment) limited
liability corporation insurance. LLC. It wasn't cheap mind you, but in
the unlikely event I killed some very expensive hardware; it didn't come
out of my pocket. The limit I had was 250,000.

Every PC shop I've ever worked at also carried atleast that amount, some
carried more; but they were larger shops and could afford the premiums on
it. It's just not economically a good idea to work on someone elses stuff
if you don't have a way to cover your ass if something goes wrong; some
company policy won't due if the customer sues you for hardware/network
wiring, etc, damages.

I'm not some wannabe technician David, so we should start off on the
right foot. I worked for one company longer than you've even been doing
this (according to your 9 years in business post).. shiat, I've been
programming longer than that. :P

So... are you really some ... professional or some... wannabe doing this
from your home? And mind you, I have nothing against those who do it from
home; as long as their totally professional. And by that, I mean proper
paperwork as well.


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie





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| People have reacted in horror to seeing body shop people jump on bumpers to
| straighten them, too, just like I react in horror when someone starts a
| barbecue fire with a petroleum fire starter instead of newspapers and
| kindling.

| I have only stated what I've experienced about the fan blades.  It was a bitch
| taking the laptop apart and removing the mother board to get at the bent fan
| blade.  I couldn't very well charge for my time on that one.  As I recall I
| ate about 1 1/2 extra hours on that job, when I lost a couple screws and
| didn't have replacements.  I was all over the carpet with my magnet trying to
| find them.  I never used compressed air again.

| And as for the feather duster, I go for what works for the least amount of
| hassle.  Again, as an alternative I suggested the microfibre cloths available
| at any Walgreen's if you're squeamish about feather dusters.

| I'm not going to get terribly worried about "corrosion" of cheap sheet metal
| enclosures and mouting bays from a the use of a feather duster if removing the
| dust helps keep things from overheating.  And no circuit board is going to
| suffer from a once-over with a feather duster, either, as long as it's
| grounded and I'm grounded.

This is quite a different situation.  This lab has *numerous* Dell (notebooks
and
desktops) and Panasonic ToughBook computers on benches that are running as well
dozens on
the shelf.  The lab is split into two parts.  One part is mine for the maintence
and
distribution of production computers.  The other part is for the techical
management
personnel using the notebooks in conjunction with our "highly spacialized"
products (not
discussable).

The point is all of us are qualified engineers and some, like me, certified
computer
technicians.  Basically what you puport about your dust removal methodolgy as
well as the
air bending fins/blades is frankly .....   I'll leave it at that I don't need to
go
further.


--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie



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Professionally, I always used the can of air method - haven't you guys
ever used that old standby?

(spit shines and air compressors - sheesh <rolls eyes>)



Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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I haven't seen any compressed air cans with extremely high PSI. They seem
to work fine for blowing out the cooling system on laptops.
 
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Hmm, I too am operating from real life experience...I've been able to
remove much more dust (sometimes, not requiring me to disassemble the
machine if it's bad) with an air can than I ever could by blowing into
the fins. Your breath doesn't have that much force and isn't going to
dislodge anything but the largest lightest of particles and debrees.
 
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That's a bit redneck way of fixing something, don't ya think?


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie





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| I recommend against using compressed air for a laptop because I feel the
| pressure is too great and may bend the delicate fins on the fan.  This is why
| I recommend gently blowing into the air output holes, since it's far easier to
| control one's breath than it is a cannister full of compressed air.  A few
| puffs can dislodge a lot of gunk.


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| I bought a cheap feather duster.  I use it with just a touch of spray
| furniture polish (just a light spray, to just give it enough oil to pick up
| the dust.  With this I can gently pull the plumes along various circuit
| boards, around components, under the HD bay, etc., to pick up a *lot* of gunk
| from inside the chassis.  Then a rigorous shake of the duster will dislodge
| the dust.


The air pressure from a cannister of compressed air will not "bend the delicate
fins on
the fan" (blades) or the fins of the heat sink.

I wouldn't use any "furniture polish" as you don't know what chemicals are used
which may
cause corrosion of electronics.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie




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All I can say is that I'm operating from personal experience.  I used a can of
compressed air and a couple puffs was enough to bend a fan blade so that it
woudn't even turn.  


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Again, I'm saying to just LIGHTLY spritz the feather duster, NOT saturate it.  
The idea is to give the dust something to hold onto.  Some feather dusters
have enough oil on them naturally that this isn't necessary, but some don't
have enough natural oil to do so.  

I'm talking from personal experience.  The computer I'm using at this moment I
dusted in this manner about 2 years ago and everything is working fine.  In
fact, SpeedFan shows that all 4 temperature sensors are operating cool -- 34,
48, 34, 33 degrees Celsius.  The last time I looked inside, I didn't see
anything odd about any components, either.




Re: Trojan Zombie





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| All I can say is that I'm operating from personal experience.  I used a can of
| compressed air and a couple puffs was enough to bend a fan blade so that it
| woudn't even turn.


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| Again, I'm saying to just LIGHTLY spritz the feather duster, NOT saturate it.
| The idea is to give the dust something to hold onto.  Some feather dusters
| have enough oil on them naturally that this isn't necessary, but some don't
| have enough natural oil to do so.

| I'm talking from personal experience.  The computer I'm using at this moment I
| dusted in this manner about 2 years ago and everything is working fine.  In
| fact, SpeedFan shows that all 4 temperature sensors are operating cool -- 34,
| 48, 34, 33 degrees Celsius.  The last time I looked inside, I didn't see
| anything odd about any components, either.



I am a certified Toshiba NB technician.

Even a spritz of "furniture polish" is too much.  It is the wrong solution for
electronics.

For a blade of a fan to be impacted by air pressure from cannister of compressed
air the
blades would have to be of pie tin grade aluminum. There just isn't that mch
force.

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Trojan Zombie



Hello, David!

You wrote on Sun, 9 May 2010 16:43:48 -0400:


 | For a blade of a fan to be impacted by air pressure from cannister of
 | compressed air the blades would have to be of pie tin grade aluminum.
 | There just isn't that mch force.
 |
I just put  a tooth pick in the fan grill (to hold the fan) then air clean
toward the heat sink.
--
With best regards, gufus.  E-mail: stop.nospam.gbbsg@shaw.ca



Re: Trojan Zombie



@yahoo.com says...
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If the air from a poof-can was enough to damage a computer case, heat
sink, video card, etc.. cooling fan the fan should not have been used to
start with. In 30 years I've not seen a single fan, heat-sink, etc...
damaged from the standard store bought poof-cans, even using the little
wand that comes with them.

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Oil will transfer to the fan causing it to collect MORE dust more
quickly, and I say this from 30 years of experience.

Why do you think that the Navy uses a light sprits of OIL on the metal
filters in duct-work on ships - because IT ATTRACTS DUST.

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It would appear that many of us have 20+ years your experience.

--
You can't trust your best friends, your five senses, only the little
voice inside you that most civilians don't even hear -- Listen to that.  
Trust yourself.
spam999free@rrohio.com (remove 999 for proper email address)

Re: Trojan Zombie




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Did I say anything about touching a fan with a feather duster?  I did not.  


Re: Trojan Zombie



sfdavidkaye2@yahoo.com (David Kaye) wrote in

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I can't say as I've ever seen this issue. Short of the blade coming in
contact with something, even a bent blade will spin. If the motor
appeared locked up, I'd say the bearings were bad; likely due to
excessive overheating conditions.
 
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Oil is very bad directly on electronics man.. Corrosive as hell for them.
 
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How many computers have you professionally serviced in the last year? As
you speak from personal experience, is this an isolated incident or ?


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


Re: Trojan Zombie




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Not to mention a good source of static generation; as oil will let the dust
particles attach to everything powered up.. :( Electronics tend to generate
a nice magnetic field that brings the dust to them. Oiling them is only
going to ensure the dust sticks and builds up a nasty film; trapping even
more heat and killing the electronics even sooner.
  


--
"Hrrngh! Someday I'm going to hurl this...er...roll this...hrrngh.. nudge
this boulder right down a cliff." - Goblin Warrior


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