The Which Is Safer Question

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The answer to the question is: It doesn't matter.  Linux doesn't have as many
holes as Windows, but Linux is not for amateurs.  Even with Ubuntu and
Mandriva, there is still no out-of-the-box flavor of Linux that I'd trust to a
non-techie.  

People have a hard enough time clicking "Install" when Windows wants them to
put in an update.  People are not going to root around looking for drivers for
the video and wi-fi cards they need for Linux.

And there are the programs.  There are boatloads of programs written for
Windows that simply have no equivalent in Linux.  Radio station automation
software, restaurant point of sale software, good music composing software (on
a level of Band in a Box, etc) -- you just can't get Linux versions.  

Sure, Linux is fine for web surfing and Open Office (which is still not 100%
compatible with MS Office), but for most users it stops right there.  

Heck, I still don't think there's a version of QuickBooks or Peachtree
available for Linux.  How are people going to do their books?

 

Re: The Which Is Safer Question




Quoted text here. Click to load it

Hi David: While I agree with you viewpoint in your post (and I used to be a
Unix systems administrator - so I have a fondness for *NIX systems), there
are a couple of accounting software packages that can be run on Linux.
However, the impression I have is that none of them are anywhere near the
quality and user friendliness of the commercial Windows packages such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree.

But for those who want to try an accounting package on Linux, here's a
couple to look at:

TurboCASH Accounting
- entry level Accounting package
- Delphi development in Windows, Linux in Wine
http://www.turbocashuk.com/index.html


GnuCash (this may be closer to the functionality of Quicken as opposed to
QuickBooks)
- personal and small-business financial-accounting software
- available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows.
http://www.gnucash.org /


SQL-LedgerŽ ERP
- double entry accounting/ERP system
- SQL-Ledger is platform independent and runs on any *NIX, Mac or Windows
computer.
http://www.sql-ledger.com /


The above listings were taken from Open Source Accounts and ERP Software at
http://www.squidoo.com/opensourceaccounts#module1295149 . Some of the other
listings there may also run on Linux, but I haven't checked.

Note that from a personal standpoint, none of the 3 desktop income tax
preparation packages for the USA runs on Linux - only Windows and Mac.

Cheers,
Jerry



Re: The Which Is Safer Question




Quoted text here. Click to load it

Hi David: While I agree with you viewpoint in your post (and I used to be a
Unix systems administrator - so I have a fondness for *NIX systems), there
are a couple of accounting software packages that can be run on Linux.
However, the impression I have is that none of them are anywhere near the
quality and user friendliness of the commercial Windows packages such as
QuickBooks or Peachtree.

But for those who want to try an accounting package on Linux, here's a
couple to look at:

TurboCASH Accounting
- entry level Accounting package
- Delphi development in Windows, Linux in Wine
http://www.turbocashuk.com/index.html


GnuCash (this may be closer to the functionality of Quicken as opposed to
QuickBooks)
- personal and small-business financial-accounting software
- available for GNU/Linux, BSD, Solaris, Mac OS X and Microsoft Windows.
http://www.gnucash.org /


SQL-LedgerŽ ERP
- double entry accounting/ERP system
- SQL-Ledger is platform independent and runs on any *NIX, Mac or Windows
computer.
http://www.sql-ledger.com /


The above listings were taken from Open Source Accounts and ERP Software at
http://www.squidoo.com/opensourceaccounts#module1295149 . Some of the other
listings there may also run on Linux, but I haven't checked.

Note that from a personal standpoint, none of the 3 desktop income tax
preparation packages for the USA runs on Linux - only Windows and Mac.

Cheers,
Jerry



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