The infamous email shuffle words virus or something - Page 2

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Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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Interesting. Why only on the free servers?  Perhaps more
"shady" (corrupt) employees work at the free servers?

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I still don't understand.  This "hub" would have to be tapped to the
underground internet cable (if I'm not using wireless) running from my
house to the ISP?  Here in Greece it is buried about a half metre
underground, usually next to the side of the paved road in a city.  Is
this what you have in mind?  This sort of tapping?  Very interesting
if true.  I've never heard or even read of this happening, and can't
imagine anybody doing this, except maybe by the secret services like
the CIA, SIS, ABIN, KGB, etc. Of course stealing wireless signals at
public hotspots is well known, but that's a different topic.

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http://hidemyass.com /

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

On Sun, 22 May 2011 06:24:25 -0700, RayLopez99 wrote:

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    Lower salaries. Less scared to lose their jobs.
//
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     ABIN ? Do they work in Greece ?
    If you live in an apartment block, it's pretty easy to access the
cables. Each floor has a box where the wires lead to.
    Dunno about Greece. The wire goes from your router straight down
into the ground or does it go through a garden, a post or something like
that ?
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    Looks interesting. And free. (Ad-driven ?)
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Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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Makes sense.  I think you could make a few thousand reals or maybe
dollars selling a couple of million email addresses.

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ABIN is everywhere--funded by the US CIA, LOL.

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I'm not sure how it works.  But I know that the DSL of course runs off
your telephone lines, which feed into a street level splitter (?) box
that stands at the corner of my apartment, on the street, and also the
phone company has traditional concrete (or wooden if you're in the
USA) pillars / posts that the telephone wire is strung on that feed
into this box.  From the box, I figure there's a splitter that must
feed into the internet cable that runs under the street?  Or else why
would they dig a trench for an internet cable if they (the phone
company that runs the internet, here OTENET) can use the telephone
wires?  So there must be a splitter.  Maybe at the splitter box an
eavesdropper can tap a wired email communication?  If they can fake
ATM cards and swipe ATM data they can also do this I guess.

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 They do have a free version but I pay, as it is faster and no ads.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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And you're calling me an idiot? *laugh laugh laugh*.

Ray, you're still a newbie dumbass punk.



--
Why drink the water from my hand?
Contagious as you think I am
Just tilt my sun towards your domain
Your cup runneth over again

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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Why don't you surprise us just once instead of answering indirectly,
pretending you know the answer?  Show your ignorance, and reply on
point, pointy head.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

RayLopez99 wrote:
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It would be encrypted while traveling from your computer to the computer
it negotiated the SSL with. It would keep doing this by re-negotiating
on every session until it arrived at the computer mailbox (unencrypted)
for the recipient.

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Yes, and at the socket layer before the client (the mailbox) gets it and
holds it for the mail client (OE for instance) to retrieve.

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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OK, thanks, I got that.  I am guessing that at every handshake the
computers negotiate SSL based on a certificate going back and forth,
and I'm guessing that this would slow down delivery of your email
some, even if said email might be compressed if encrypted.

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OK.  See also my reply to Shadow and feel free to add any further
comments.  Thank you.

RL


Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

RayLopez99 wrote:
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Based in part on a (pseudo) random number (pre-secret) each party
generates that gets concatenated after each passes that number to each
other covered by the key in the certificate. The resulting session key
is unique to that session. The servers handle the e-mails in the normal
manner and if another SSL session is required another one is negotiated
and another unique key is generated and the mail is re-encrypted and sent.

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I would like to clarify a point. My misstatement above - the mailbox is
not really a client it is a server. A minor point, but it was bugging
me. My point was only that it is like encrypted voice communication,
eavesdropping can be done in the room where the voices are heard, but
*not* on the wire connecting them.

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

RayLopez99 wrote:

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       [snip]

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Not just one, but many agents are listening.
Agents at both governmental organizations and private
corporations. Echelon, FBI, Google, /et cetera/ /ad nauseam/
somewhat depending on your location and the path your message takes.


--
"'How are you?' he said to me,
I said it back to him"


Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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I wonder how true this is.  When you send a ping sometimes there's
only a few nodes inbetween your PC and your email destination, so I'm
not so sure about "et cetera".  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Echelon_%28sig =
nals_intelligence%29
- Echelon sounds like Urban Legend though I'm sure you know more than
me on this.

Still, I agree that potential for mischief in reading emails exists,
though in practice so much traffic flows and due to memory constraints
I doubt emails are kept more than a few days on most email relay
servers, and perhaps up to two weeks for anonymous servers due to
legal requirements.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

d6ef4e082dfe@t19g2000yql.googlegroups.com:

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I'm just waiting to see how you attempt to educate those foolish enough
to try and help you.


--
Why drink the water from my hand?
Contagious as you think I am
Just tilt my sun towards your domain
Your cup runneth over again

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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I educate you, Foolish Dustbin.  Taking you to skool, trollbait.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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It'll be years before you have any knowledge that I would require. And
even then, that's being generous. See, I already know the stuff you ask
questions about. I've played both sides of the fence and you're still
playing tiddlywinks. Whether you like it or not, you are my bitch, not
the other way around.



--
Why drink the water from my hand?
Contagious as you think I am
Just tilt my sun towards your domain
Your cup runneth over again

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

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 Riiiggght shiite head.  Not.

Please answer this question:  how is email read hostilely, by a third
part?  Please describe a typical scenario.  The silence is deafening.

Go play with your fence now dunce.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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When rolling stones writes something about you in print, I'll take what
you have to say with some respect. When an antimalware company hires
you as a malware researcher, What you have to say might have some
bearing. When you develop and support your own antimalware application
(Obviously you won't be doing this anytime soon, as you can't code),
your opinion might have some value to me...  Until then...
 
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I'm not going to play this game with you, Several others already tried
and failed (imo) to explain how SSL works. You've got fresh bait now
trying again. You won't reel me in.
 
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The only dunce Ray, is you. I already know how SSL works. I've authored
several crypto programs. Have you authored.. well, anything yet?

Here, I'll make this piss easy. Explain for us all what each of the
following lines of code does. No cheating, you do it yourself.
This is very simple, if you understand things even a little.

Put up or shut the fuck up, as they say. [g]

segment code

start:
mov ax,data
mov ds,ax
mov ax,stack
mov ss,ax
mov sp,stacktop

mov dx,hello
mov ah,9
int 0x21

mov ax,0x4c00
int 0x21

segment data

hello: db 'AGRTEYdg1736s1',13,10,'$'

segment stack stack
resb 64
stacktop:


--
Why drink the water from my hand?
Contagious as you think I am
Just tilt my sun towards your domain
Your cup runneth over again

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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Oh geez.  This azz clown is proud of the fact he still writes in
assembly. Nowadays you let the compiler figure this out and move to a
higher level language like C#.

As for my programming skillz, you can Google my name in Google Groups
and see the questions I have answered as well as the source code I've
posted.  And I just finished an IM app that works in Silverlight--
imagine doing dat in assembly?

You are dismissed little nasty hand man.

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

On Sat, 21 May 2011 04:40:40 -0700 (PDT), RayLopez99

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    Simple program follows...
    And I respect him for that.

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    What he meant is that you can only DEBUG in assembly. If you
don't know assembly, no matter what language you program in, you are
half knackered. It's hard to learn, but absolutely essential.
    IMHO
    []'s

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

4ax.com:

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It's as simple as one can get. It's the same program we're all supposed
to write at some point, in whatever language. I just wanted to give you a
real idea of the sort of person you're dealing with here.
 
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As I said, RayLopez is a bit of a modern troll, but that's about as far
as it goes.


--
Why drink the water from my hand?
Contagious as you think I am
Just tilt my sun towards your domain
Your cup runneth over again

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something


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I respectfully disagree.  Though it's true that in C# there is a
Intermediate Language (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki /
Common_Intermediate_Language) that is somewhat analogous to assembly
(though at a slightly higher level), I don't think that for 99.9% of
debugging you have to know how to read it.  Of course for that 0.1% it
comes in handy, but usually there are workarounds (like rewriting your
program 'from scratch' if it does not work--that often will solve any
tough, hidden bugs in it).

RL

Re: The infamous email shuffle words virus or something

RayLopez99 wrote:
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Assembly enjoys an intimate relationship with the hardware it is running
on - the mnemonics are in a direct relationship with the opcodes through
a lookup table. *All* other 'higher level' languages are abstractions.

Here is a sample list from an Intel instruction set.

http://home.comcast.net/~fbui/intel.html

Those mnemonic codes are just easier for humans to distinquish from one
another than are the actual strings of ones and zeroes in the actual
opcodes.

Very useful in firmware and driver software.

If you are given a binary executable, and you want to optimize the code
to fit in a certain small EEPROM, you have to use assembly because all
HLLs are less efficient - a sacrifice made so that the "programmer"
didn't have to do all the work that a "coder" has to do and can then
focus more on what he wants the program to do.

Programmers can be blissfully unaware of how their programs actually work.



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