Spybot search and destroy - Page 2

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Re: Spybot search and destroy


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Thanks Dave for this helpful info.



Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Thu, 28 May 2009 20:40:59 +0000 (UTC), "What's in a Name?"
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If you refuse to insulate yourself from these fools and their insults,
then shut up and quit whining when you become the butt of their jokes.

Re: Spybot search and destroy

thought it would be fun to share this little dity with the class:

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The only one who seems to be whining is you.
--
Virus Removal http://max.shplink.com/removal.html
Change nomail.afraid.org to gmail.com to reply by email.
nomail.afraid.org is specifically set up for use in USENET.
Feel free to use it yourself.

Re: Spybot search and destroy


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Worse than that is all of the web to usenet gateways.



Re: Spybot search and destroy



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| Worse than that is all of the web to usenet gateways.


Y E S  !

--
Dave
http://www.claymania.com/removal-trojan-adware.html
Multi-AV - http://www.pctipp.ch/downloads/dl/35905.asp



Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Thu, 28 May 2009 22:25:16 -0400, David H. Lipman wrote:

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Sconded, or should that be thirded? :-)

Re: Spybot search and destroy


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I've been using SPYBOT S&D (free) for YEARS and it's been nothing short of
great. Easy to use and a better bug catcher and destroyer you'll not find,
period.



Re: Spybot search and destroy


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I have been using it for years as well and just had to disable the
Immunization part.  It (and 2 or 3 others) interfere with Internet
Explorer 8 and it barely crawls.  Once I got the information from the MS
guys, I disabled it and also SpywareBlaster seems to be part and parcel
of it because many of its protection features were disabled as well.

I miss having them working........well, I was going to get rid of Spybot
cuz it is too slow.  But it was also slowing down Firefox which is the
only browser I use, so I had no choice but to disable Spybot.  Firefox
was immediately back to normal as well once I did that.

Just my 2 cents worth.......Heather
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Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Mon, 1 Jun 2009 17:31:03 -0400, Heather wrote:

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Heather, how can Spybot slow down any browser? It runs and then it
finishes. The immunisation feature is the ony thing I can think of which
has a more or less permanent effect, and I can't see how that could slow
down any browser. What am I missing, or do you in fact have some other
problem with your PC?

Regards,

Roy

Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Tue, 2 Jun 2009 17:47:07 +0100, Slarty

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The immunization feature of Spybot *can* cause the slowing down of IE8.
http://forums.spybot.info/showthread.php?t=46906
http://msmvps.com/blogs/donna/archive/2009/03/20/ie8-issues-if-immunization-by-spybot-s-amp-d-is-enabled.aspx

--
Fred W. (NL)

Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Tue, 02 Jun 2009 19:14:07 +0200, FredW wrote:

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http://msmvps.com/blogs/donna/archive/2009/03/20/ie8-issues-if-immunization-by-spybot-s-amp-d-is-enabled.aspx

I would never use that, Firefox for me, but that's far from being the only
reason. I'm not sure why there should be that problem though. I like
learning new things. Thanks.

Cheers,

Roy

Re: Spybot search and destroy

Slarty wrote:
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FF is no longer secure, on account of a .NET update from MS.

 From the mozilla.support.firefox group:

................................................
NightStalker wrote:
 > It appears that Microsoft, in its unmitigated arrogance, has
installed an addon into Firefox in one of the recent Windows updates.
It shows in the Addons list as "Microsoft .NET Framework Assistant"

Interesting article in TechRepublic this morning...

http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=1716&tag=nl.e019

The article...

Microsoft pushed out its .NET Framework 3.5 Service Pack 1 update this
February. The “List of changes and fixes” article about this update says:

     The .NET Framework 3.5 SP1 is a full cumulative update that
contains many new features. These new features build incrementally upon
the .NET Framework 2.0, the .NET Framework 3.0, and the .NET Framework
3.5. It also includes cumulative servicing updates to the dependent .NET
Framework 2.0 and .NET Framework 3.0 subcomponents. This update should
be applied as an important update for the .NET Framework 2.0 and later
versions, and it is recommended for all other supported operating systems.

The article then goes on to list a dizzying array of changes delivered
by the update.

According to Annoyances.org, however, it does something that isn’t
listed there — it installs the Microsoft .NET Framework Assistant
extension for Firefox, silently, without informing the user. If you had
Firefox on your computer when this update was installed, you may be
subject to some dire consequences. In Remove the Microsoft .NET
Framework Assistant (ClickOnce) Firefox Extension, Annoyances.org says:

     This update adds to Firefox one of the most dangerous
vulnerabilities present in all versions of Internet Explorer: the
ability for websites to easily and quietly install software on your PC.
Since this design flaw is one of the reasons you may’ve originally
choosen to abandon IE in favor of a safer browser like Firefox, you may
wish to remove this extension with all due haste.

Yes, that’s right — the long-time, well known security hole present in
Internet Explorer that consists of essentially letting Websites install
dangerous, untrusted code on your computer willy-nilly has now been
shoehorned into your MS Windows install of Firefox without your
knowledge or permission.

Worse yet, Microsoft isn’t satisfied with just giving you
vulnerabilities without your permission or even you knowledge. It has
also gone out of its way to ensure that you’ll have a difficult time
removing the vulnerability from your system if you should happen to
become aware of it. The Uninstall button for this extension in Firefox
has been deactivated. In Uninstalling the Clickonce Support for Firefox,
Microsoft employee Brad Abrams says:

     We added this support at the machine level in order to enable the
feature for all users on the machine. Seems reasonable right? Well,
turns out that enabling this functionality at the machine level, rather
than at the user level means that the “Uninstall” button is grayed out
in the Firefox Add-ons menu because standard users are not permitted to
uninstall machine-level components.

Brad Abrams explains that an update has been produced, in response to a
lot of negative reaction from people who realized that MS was monkeying
around with their Firefox installs without permission or notification,
that turns the extension into a “per-user component”. Of course, he
thoroughly downplays the negative reaction, saying:

     Clearly this is a bit frustrating for some users that wanted an
easy way to uninstall the Clickonce Support for Firefox.

Reading some of the Slashdot commentary, I’d say it was far worse than
“a bit frustrating” for some user. It was downright enraging for some,
and I don’t blame them.

He claims turning the .NET Framework Assistant into a per-user component
makes uninstalling it “a LOT cleaner”. In some respects, this is true.
The process for a full uninstall that was necessary to get it out of
your hair as a standard system user can be pretty scary for someone who
isn’t a bona-fide expert computer user. Even most so-called Power Users
should be vary leery of following those instructions. Those of us who
have actually gotten to the point where we edited registry keys for a
living (yes, I had a job a few years back that included that unenviable
task, and I got quite good at doing so quickly and safely), on the other
hand, should find it pretty simple.

On the other hand, making it a per-user component means that when one
user uninstalls it, another can still have it. If you’re uninstalling it
for security reasons, this should set off a warning klaxon in your head,
complete with flashing red lights. If you’re the only person who ever
uses your computer, this might mitigate the problem somewhat, but anyone
who manages to remotely exploit your system as another unprivileged user
account may then be able to make use of the security hole represented by
the .NET Framework Assistant to increase his or her hold on the system
(among other nightmare scenarios that may spring to mind).

I guess you have to admire the sheer chutzpah of someone like Brad
Abrams trying to put a bright, happy face on this situation. It takes
real courage to stand out front telling users about this major hose-job
and try to find a way to spin it so the users won’t turn into a lynch
mob. At least he has the decency to tell us how to do the work necessary
to remove the unwanted Firefox extension. Go read his Weblog post
(linked above) now, and make the necessary changes, if you’re using
Firefox on MS Windows.

I recommend you do the registry hacking necessary to carve this thing
out of the guts of your system, get rid of Firefox entirely and use some
other third-party Web browser that isn’t known for screwing its users,
or just get rid of MS Windows entirely, at this point. Do you remember
when I listed 5 characteristics of security policy I can trust? Yeah.
Anything that Microsoft can modify from afar like this doesn’t even
begin to satisfy my criteria, and this incident is an excellent example
of that.

It looks like the biggest security vulnerability in Mozilla Firefox this
year is Microsoft.

--
Jordon
........................................

cheers,

wolf k.

Re: Spybot search and destroy


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I removed all .NET Framework from my PC.
(I use no programs requiring any version of Framework.)

I am confident my Firefox (3.5.b4) is safe.
I have no strange extensions or plugins.
 ;-)

--
Fred W. (NL)

Re: Spybot search and destroy


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Even if you left .NET installed you could just uninstall that addon I bet.
--
Michael Cecil
http://home.roadrunner.com/~macecil /
http://home.roadrunner.com/~safehex /
http://home.roadrunner.com/~macecil/hackingw7 /

Removing MS NET add-on for Firefox (was:Re: Spybot search and destroy)

Michael Cecil wrote:
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See:

http://blogs.techrepublic.com.com/security/?p=1716&tag=nl.e019

I tried it, works well.

HTH

wolf k.

Re: Removing MS NET add-on for Firefox (was:Re: Spybot search and destroy)

Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Wed, 03 Jun 2009 12:17:44 -0400, Wolf K wrote:

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Thank you for all that, but I am already well aware of the problem and have
taken steps to remove it. Permanently.

Too much to post here, and good advice can easily be found on the net with
a modicum of searching, but 'Windows Secrets' is a good place to start.
They were on to this in February with advice. It may have been in the
subscription version, I can't recall now.

Cheers,

Roy

Re: Spybot search and destroy


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Hi Hon.......read what Fred put out there.  I have been back and forth
with PA Bear (MS MVP) and yes, the Immunization feature was just killing
both IE8 and FF.  But worse with IE8.  I was going to remove it, but
since FF was now much faster decided to stay with a disabled Spybot.

The link Fred gave refers back to discussions in March, I believe.  But
I know that they knew around Mar. 20th that Spybot and 2 or 3 others
were playing havoc with IE8.  I don't use IE very often, so was a bit
slow off the mark on that.  MS sneakily downloaded it when I wasn't
looking!!  (G)

Cheers......Heather

PS....I would have to find the exact name, but it is a security feature
in IE8 that Spybot is tangling with.  If you want the name, I will find
it.



Re: Spybot search and destroy

On Tue, 2 Jun 2009 15:41:06 -0400, Heather wrote:

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Hm, I've had no such problems with neither Firefox nor Opera on XP or
Vista.

Ah the wonders of Microsnot!

Cheers,

Roy

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