Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet

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The internet is not really world wide (or, why cannot I access US sites fro
m the Philippines (PH) without a proxy server outside the PH?)

From the Philippines, I tried to get some printer drivers from Canon (US),  
and my connection timed out.  I then tried to access Gizmo's freeware site,
 and the connection timed out.  I tried CNN.COM and it worked, so I knew it
 was some sort of 'geolocation' blockage.  I next found a Canon India websi
te, and was able to download my driver from there.  I tried to access my US
 based email server to download my email, which normally works, but was blo
cked.  I then logged into a proxy server, the same one I am using to post t
his message (Your IP Address Is:206.196.103.213 Region: Moscow Country: Rus
sian Federation), and, despite the fact the proxy server is in Moscow of al
l places, I was able to get into Gizmo as well as Canon's US site.

Why?  Some sort of geolocation blocking.  I have run across this before for
 certain sites showing a video that is only available to US residents, but  
never before on this scale.  Are certain countries sometimes blocked due to
 spam concerns?

RL

Re: Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet

On Tue, 4 Mar 2014 16:31:28 -0800 (PST), RayLopez99

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    Spam, politics, copyrights, whatever. Yes. I'm frequently
blocked by Youtube when I try to see Australian or sometimes American
videos. (from Brazil). If I use a proxy in those countries, no problem
    Also since we are on the SUBJECT of MALWARE, I believe that
the malware they used in the Iranian nuclear reactors was
geo-sensitive, or else it would have spread all over the world. There
are probably other examples out there. A country does not want
government -made malware backfiring and taking down their own IT..
Although all the enemy has to do is decompile, change the target IP
range. then recompile. Or just do a simple patch. (depends how
encrypted it is)
    []'s
--  
Don't be evil - Google 2004
We have a new policy  - Google 2012

Re: Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet


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It wasn't reactors, it was centrifuges.

STUXNET was restricted in how far it could propagate but a change was
made to it that created a bug. This bug was responsible for it
escaping once it bridged the air-gap at Natanz when someone took his
laptop home from work and connected it to the Internet. The payload
itself would only deploy if it found itself inside a particular
configuration of SCADA software with exactly the right kind of
hardware.

Re: Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet

Shadow formulated on Tuesday :
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IIRC it used language clues. It also changed its worm behavior if the  
virus' target environment (Step 7) wasn't found.



Re: Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet

On Tue, 4 Mar 2014 16:31:28 -0800 (PST), RayLopez99

Quoted text here. Click to load it

There is probably no blockage purely due to spam concerns but there
will be blockage for financial reasons or due to excessive problems
with a block of IP addresses. I have had to block some IP ranges
myself on servers I have operational control over (all of it due to
hack attacks). I can't remember if Philippines was one I had to block
but I can't imagine why a large US commercial site would block port 80
traffic constantly or selectively. Such a block would be better done
at a border between ISPs rather than at a site so the site would be
completely inaccessible rather than restriction of download.

An ISP has to have peering agreements with other ISPs in order pay for
the bandwidth they use when passing traffic between them (the Internet
isn't financially free) since peers charge each other for carrying
traffic. A user in Philippines most likely has access to Internet via
some provider and that provider has access via submarine cable or
satellite via some other provider and there is a financial cost for
that. Each ISP "peers" with adjacent ISPs and pays a toll for that
connection. All bandwidth is more expensive every time it has to
traverse another ISP and once it gets onto the mainland of Asia there
are lots of borders to cross.  

Another thing that might be happening is site selectivity. Canon may
be insisting that downloads from certain regions be done from their
site in Japan or Taiwan rather than North America but to be done
properly it should have redirected rather than just block. Akamai is
known to provide that kind of distribution for their customers.

Then there is the issue of cryptography. Strong crypto is considered
munitions by the U.S. DoD and access to files that implement it cannot
be "exported". I cannot imagine how censorship like that is even
accomplished or why Philippines would be on the restricted list.

A traceroute will tell you something about the pathway between your
location and a destination and whether it's totally blocked or just
content blocked but these days a non-ping response is not necessarily
an indication of censorship. If a site blocks downloads but not
"normal" site content and is pingable then it's very likely that it is
traffic shaping as described above. You could also try FTP download
vs. HTTP download.

Geek question: geolocation blocking of the internet

+ User FidoNet address: 1:3634/12.71
On Tue, 04 Mar 2014, RayLopez99 wrote to All:

[trim]

 R> Why?  Some sort of geolocation blocking.  I have run across this  
 R> before for certain sites showing a video that is only available to  
 R> US residents, but never before on this scale.  Are certain  
 R> countries sometimes blocked due to spam concerns?

yes... spam and script kiddies always beating on folk's servers... admins and
those who host their own servers just get tired of it so they throw up a block
of the ISP's netblock... when that doesn't stop the crap, they enlarge the
block to encompass the region... eventually they block by country...

now, some sites, block for regional access so their support systems in the
closest region to the user will be used... then, of course, you have things
like "the great firewall of china" that some countries use to restrict access
to what they deem as inappropriate...

)\/(ark

One of the great tragedies of life is the murder of a beautiful theory by a
gang of brutal facts. --Benjamin Franklin
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