Family post card virus -- a hoax?

Do you have a question? Post it now! No Registration Necessary.  Now with pictures!

Threaded View
A few days ago, I received email from a friend who had forward a
message to her whole mailing list.  This message said that there is a
new deadly virus, discovered by McAfee, that sends you email with the
title:
You have received a post card from a family member.
    If you open this email, your sector zero will be destroyed and
your computer will be useless.

Well, I haven't received this message.  I am on AOL, perhaps it gets
filtered out.  But what interests me is that I have seen no mention of
it in this newsgroup.  Is this a hoax?
Thanks.  Pete

Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

On this special day, Paul Brady wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Your machine will not be destroyed, but brought under external control.
It is questionable whether this is much better.

This mail subject is very probably a message from the Storm Worm, see
http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=3117 and
http://isc.sans.org/diary.html?storyid=3298

You should at least not click on the link (always an IP number), else
the page (when active) will try to exploit vulnerabilities and tell you
that your message must be downloaded. The click on the next link
(actually an executable file) will run it, and the exe will download
and install trojans on your computer and turn it into a "zombie" ie
something that waits for commands from outside and fulfil whatever the
machine is asked for.


Gabriele Neukam

Gabriele.Spamfighter.Neukam@t-online.de

--
Quoted text here. Click to load it
(Roger Hunt in uk.comp.vintage)
In a want it now instantly straight away world - no :-)
(Krustov in ucv)



Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

Paul Brady explained on 26-8-2007 :
Quoted text here. Click to load it

That is typical of a hoax (sending to a whole mailing list).


Quoted text here. Click to load it

Words about a "new deadly virus" will *never* be spread by
an email (and not at all to someone like your friend).
Of course this is a hoax.

Did her email tell you to forward this message to everyone
in your mailing list?
That is also typical of a hoax.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

I rest my case.
 ;-)

--
Fred Wening (NL)



Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
Thanks for your reply.  This reminds me of the "teddy bear" hoax a few
years back when  message said that you may be infected if you have
some sort of file in the system directory with a teddy bear as a icon,
and urged you to delete it, as many people did.  Of course it was
there, it came with Windows.  I recall that it was a relatively unused
file involving Java scripts.

Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

on 26-8-2007, Paul Brady supposed :
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yes, that was the "Bugbear/Jdbgmgr.exe" hoax.
 :-D

--
Fred Wening (NL)



Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

FredW wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it
[restore snipped text]
title:
You have received a post card from a family member.

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Apparently, Fred, you haven't received any of the "greeting card" emails
yet.

It is not a hoax. If you click on the proffered link to get your
"greeting card", and if you are running an insecure computer (using an
insecure operating system component that pretends to be a browser), your
computer will soon become a zombie.

There are variations of the subject and text:

"You have received a post card from a family member."
"You have received a post card from a classmate."
"You have received a greeting card from a friend."
etc.

All have a link consisting of an IP address and a subdirectory. Probably
the IP of the *last* person who clicked to get *his* greeting card.

--
   -bts
   -Motorcycles defy gravity; cars just suck

Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

On Aug 26, 4:58 pm, "Beauregard T. Shagnasty"
<stuff snipped>
Quoted text here. Click to load it
The "hook" has seem to have switched to a "morphed" youtube clip.
Not really a clip, but a download, the same as the greeting card
ones.   I have been getting about 2x youtube e-mails over the greeting
card ones.


Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

Beauregard T. Shagnasty formulated the question :
Quoted text here. Click to load it

Yes, the message from the friend is a hoax.

"This message said that there is a new deadly virus, discovered by
"McAfee, that sends you email with the ...."

McAfee (and any other company) never sends warnings by email
about a "new deadly virus".

So the message of OP is a hoax.

However ......... at the same time!!
"Greeting card" emails are sent with malware.
And yes, these emails are to be handled very carefully.

So, someone is sending a hoax, referring to the real
greeting card emails with malware.

If an email contains something about "a new deadly virus",
and mentions "McAfee/Norton/[any av supplier] ....."
chances are 99% the message is a hoax.

 ;-)

--
Fred Wening (NL)



Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

On Aug 26, 2007, Paul Brady wrote:
Quoted text here. Click to load it

These kinds of things are both hoaxes and real at the same time.

Typically any and all malware whose warnings circulate via e-mail between
friends, will destroy your computer, and was "just discovered this morning",
is a hoax, insofar as it's not a specific problem.

HOWEVER, greeting card and otherwise socially friendly e-mails are not
uncommon forms of distribution of invitations to click a link and thereby
become infected by something nefarious.


Re: Family post card virus -- a hoax?

Paul Brady wrote:

Quoted text here. Click to load it

Covered very well by someone else. Mass mailings of something exciting
or terrible are usually a hoax, no matter what the subject. A real PITA
as the addresses pile up and eventually reach a compromised machine
where all those addresses get harvested and sold to spammers and malware
distributors.

On the other hand, people here and in other groups discussing malware
have discussed email asking you to click on a link. From what they say,
it can be anything, from simple spam, through a phishing scheme, to a
compromised site that will dump malware in your computer if you are
vulnerable.

If you figure you just have to click on it, try to verify with the
person who was supposed to have sent it. Otherwise, do a google search
on the subject line, in quotes so you are searching on the phrase.

Most here just delete the email. The odds are overwhelming that it's
something bad or useless.

Site Timeline